The Hole We're in

The Hole We re in From award winning writer Gabrielle Zevin comes a biting powerful and deliciously entertaining novel about an American family and their misguided efforts to stay afloat spiritually morally and fina

  • Title: The Hole We're in
  • Author: Gabrielle Zevin
  • ISBN: 9780802119230
  • Page: 352
  • Format: Paperback
  • From award winning writer Gabrielle Zevin comes a biting, powerful, and deliciously entertaining novel about an American family and their misguided efforts to stay afloat spiritually, morally and financially Meet the Pomeroys a church going family living in a too red house in a Texas college town Roger, the patriarch, has impulsively gone back to school, only to find hFrom award winning writer Gabrielle Zevin comes a biting, powerful, and deliciously entertaining novel about an American family and their misguided efforts to stay afloat spiritually, morally and financially Meet the Pomeroys a church going family living in a too red house in a Texas college town Roger, the patriarch, has impulsively gone back to school, only to find his true ambitions at odds with the temptations of the present His wife, Georgia, tries to keep things in order at home, but she s been feeding the bill drawer with unopened envelopes for months and can never find the right moment to confront its swelling contents In an attempt to climb out of the holes they ve dug, Roger and Georgia make a series of choices that have catastrophic consequences for their three children especially for Patsy, the youngest, who will spend most of her life fighting to overcome them The Hole We re In shines a spotlight on some of the most relevant issues of our day over reliance on credit, vexed gender and class politics, the war in Iraq but it is Zevin s deft exploration of the fragile economy of family life that makes this a book for the ages.

    • Best Read [Gabrielle Zevin] ✓ The Hole We're in || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ✓
      352 Gabrielle Zevin
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Gabrielle Zevin] ✓ The Hole We're in || [Humor and Comedy Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Gabrielle Zevin
      Published :2018-08-23T23:26:27+00:00

    One thought on “The Hole We're in”

    1. This book was a downer with no relief. The characters were not likable and never were able to get themselves out of any of the holes they were in. A stark, pessimistic view of life with no silver lining. Not a beach read. More like a book to get you in the mood to cut yourself.

    2. Impossible to put down. Fantastically well-done look at the varied holes we climb in, climb out of, dig for ourselves, and find ourselves in. This searing family-disfunction/credit-based-society-critique/study of religious fundamentalism left the earth pretty scorched, but breathing, bleeding believable characters kept me turning pages as fast as I could read. Roger, trying to finish his PhD, leaves his wife Georgia to take care of family finances while he focuses on his dissertation- which he h [...]

    3. It took me ages, since release (I pre-ordered it)till now to read this. And so it seems the world ends today May 21st, 2011 (later in the day I guess, and maybe it is a time zone thing). Good timing to be reading a book about fundamentalist Adventist Christians. Solipsism FTW.The reason it took me those ages to read this might be because frankly, the blurb and reviews make it sound like a downer. I need to be in the right mood to want to tackle potentially devastating novels, AND often novels ab [...]

    4. I think Gabrielle is a great writer and there was a great story in this book populated with compelling characters; I just wish it wasn’t buried underneath the multitude of curse words on the pages. This book was enthralling but a real downer of a story. It is about the Pomeroy family, Roger, the father and a fanatical seventh day adventist, George his long-suffering wife, Victor, the outcast son because he went to Yale and not a religious college, Helen, a daughter with mountains of credit car [...]

    5. The story of a fundamentalist Christian family in which half the members seem to be like Nikki in Big Love--unable to stop shopping or admit to their credit card debt--was surprisingly painful to read. Surprisingly painful because none of the characters were likable, and the family situation was so fraught and tense.Nevertheless, read it I did because, well, I had to see how it would end. Lamely, as it turns out. The first quarter is by far the best; after that, the author moves forward in six y [...]

    6. Better than average drama focussing on issues of today and how they impact one family. Difference between this and most books of this type, at least for me, is that the family is fundamental Christian, employing the restrictions imposed by the church. But this does not take away the outside influences affecting everyone these days. The father's decision to complete his education at the age of 42 forces the entire family to uproot from Tennessee to Texas, plunging them deeper and deeper into debt [...]

    7. This is a book about a family that disintegrates, not because of the members' hedonism, but from their idealism. (Intolerance and bigotry are ideals to those who practice them.) Money and respectability are the main concerns of the parents, and every character must come to terms with these needs. People make choices, and oftentimes are disappointed in themselves afterwards -- but are still stuck with the consequences of those choices. Most of the book takes place in there here-and-now, but the l [...]

    8. I had a hard time reading this book because I hated all the characters, in particular the parents. It was very bizarre how no one spoke to each other about anything of importance, just hid everything and it seemed like the parents had zero emotional connections to their own children. I did like the last chapter, I hope that turns out not to be our future!

    9. 1. Gabs totally foresaw Trump America and the illegalisation of abortion in the USA2. There were so many 'hole' metaphors, it was great3. This is the third book I've read by Gabrielle, and just like in the others at least one person will dieThis book says a lot and leaves the reader to come to their own conclusions about the themes, namely to do with family and romantic relationships.

    10. This book was good however, it felt like it was about different things. More money and financial things to begin with, and more religion later on. Overall,good book.

    11. I never get tired of variations on "terrible parenting" stories. You think you had it bad? The mother in this story maxes out her credit cards and then applies for credit cards in her adult son's name when the offers appear in the mail. Using his identity, she maxes out credit cards in his name too, practically destroying his credit. The dad, a hypocritical holy roller, denies his youngest daughter her rightful inheritance (from the grandmother) because she refuses to go to a church college. Sin [...]

    12. I must respectfully disagree with the above synopsis by Good Reads as must have obviously been written by the publisher. The only point I would agree with is the “flawed and at times infuriating” although I would say ALWAYS infuriating. There is nothing at all to like about the parents in this family nor do I consider them “relatable”. What I would say is that if you are looking for the “poster” parents for some of the world's worst parents, here is your couple. The husband is a narc [...]

    13. The Hole We’re In could more accurately be titled People Making Bad Decisions. And, indeed, for the first half of the novel, it’s queasily compelling to read about Gabrielle Zevin’s “typical Middle American family” as they lie to each other and rack up a crushing amount of debt.However, Hole begins to unravel around the halfway mark. Story threads are introduced and never developed. (In some cases, story conclusions are deliberately obfuscated and I think Zevin thinks she’s being lit [...]

    14. This is very readable. It follows a mostly unpleasant family, ultimately focusing on one daughter who we see over about 20 years. I enjoyed many parts of the story and some of the characters. There was one weird thing though. Right near the end of the book, a character's 15 year old daughter is getting an abortion, her mom arranges it and goes with her. This takes place in the Eastern US in modern times (the mom served time in Iraq). The book is not an alternative history or anything, it's quite [...]

    15. The shift from 'frenetic train wreck' to 'melancholic unfolding' in the first to second halves saved this book from itself. As sharply written as the first half was, it had the flavor of a satirical one-liner. To have carried it any farther would have been exhausting but not illuminating.As it was, the more wistful and multi-textured second half caused me to reflect on how much of the horrific parents' evil antics might have stemmed from having had children before they were grown-ups themselves. [...]

    16. One reviewer contends that this novel has people who cannot be admired, but can be loved. That assessment seems too strong. Everyone in and involved with the Pomeroy family makes poor, self-centered decisions that bring on ruin and alienation, leaving scant room for empathy. Even those who suffer from the poor decisions of others (Roger Pomeroy's prominently) elicit only moderate sympathy as they compound their problems with poor judgment. For the most part the author's skewering of religion and [...]

    17. I liked how quickly the story moved along, never bogging down in details, but sharply revealing more and more of each character's motivation and insecurities with the passage of time. The treatment of abortion in the future was a bit on the nose. This is a sad, sad, story of pride and selfishness and I couldn't put it down because at first, I related to the characters. In the end, not so much, but by then, I loved them, or felt I knew them at least. On the surface it is a cautionary tale about s [...]

    18. I took this book out of my mailbox this morning, and finished it this evening. It's that compelling. It's about family, hypocrisy, debt, appearances, secrets, love, shame, and holes. Not all of the characters are likeable, but all of them (and their trajectories) are certainly true to life. I will certainly be thinking about this book for a while.

    19. This is a really interesting book, really more of a social satire. A pretty damning look at the dark side of evangelical, debt-ridden, and greedy American culture. All of the characters are both truly awful while also very compelling.

    20. 3.5 stars I really enjoyed this book for book club was an easy read that I couldn't put down. Am looking forward to discussing it in book club!

    21. Read via Audible. Great read overall. Excellent book for book club, especially for discussing themes of excessive religiosity and its impact on family upbringing.

    22. George and Roger are a clueless, disorganized, and very deep in dept couple. They have 3 children. Roger is a minister who decided he wants a PhD in education and is clueless about his finances while his eldest daughter wants an outrageously expensive wedding. You'll chuckle when you hear about some of the choices this family makes. Vincent becomes a successful screen writer, Patsy serves in the military to get the GI Bill, Helen marries a dentist. The story is mostly about Patsy after she comes [...]

    23. I downloaded this after reading The Storied Life of A J Fikry. The Hole We're In is completely different in every way. It is a tale of a sad family who makes terrible choices, and have zero coping skills to deal with the consequences. There isn't a single likeable character, yet I still felt compelled to read it to it's sad conclusion. I kept hoping someone would have an "A-ha" moment and turn the plot to a somewhat happy ending

    24. 2.5 Stars. I mildly enjoyed it, but it was by no means brilliant. There were a ton of unfinished story threads at the end that just felt sloppy. The characters were pretty universally unlikable and I don't mind that too much but if that bothers you, stay away. It also kept jumping forward several years into the future every 40 pages or so and it felt like a cheap plot device so the author didn't have to finish the story where it was.

    25. I enjoyed The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, so when I spotted another book by Zevin in my library I picked it up. Unfortunately, this one wasn't great. For me it was a slog of a read, about debt and unlikable and unrepentant characters.

    26. I was really looking forward to this book - a semi-relatable story by an author I thoroughly enjoyed (Elsewhere). Boy, was I let down. There is not one likable character in this entire novel - they are all selfish and rotten. Although an easy read, I had to force myself to finish it - don't waste your time.

    27. This book took on too many issues and was relatively unsuccessful with all of them : financial irresponsible behavior, adultery, abortion, bad parenting and extreme religiousity. The ending was quite unsatisfactory because the author simply tried to make a connection to title. I wasn't sure what the theme was, and the characters were truly unlikeable.

    28. I LOVED AJ FIKRY, The Birthright series. Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac wasn't too bad. But I just didn't think this one had the same flow as Zevin's other books. Parts were good, but all in all this one fell flat in my opinion.

    29. Zevin is a talented writer, but gah! I need at least one tiny sliver of hope. This book is such a downer, and the characters are very difficult to like, from start to finish.

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