The Wizard and the Warlord

The Wizard and the Warlord You can find an alternate cover edition hereE MAGIC IN THE BOXSigurd grew up with his grandmother bothered only by the trolls that seemed bent on destroying their settlement Then she died leaving hi

  • Title: The Wizard and the Warlord
  • Author: Elizabeth Boyer
  • ISBN: 9780345347114
  • Page: 260
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • You can find an alternate cover edition hereE MAGIC IN THE BOXSigurd grew up with his grandmother, bothered only by the trolls that seemed bent on destroying their settlement Then she died, leaving him a mysterious box he couldn t open and a confused warning against some dread warlord or wizard he couldn t be sure of which from her final ravings Then the grim warlordYou can find an alternate cover edition hereE MAGIC IN THE BOXSigurd grew up with his grandmother, bothered only by the trolls that seemed bent on destroying their settlement Then she died, leaving him a mysterious box he couldn t open and a confused warning against some dread warlord or wizard he couldn t be sure of which from her final ravings Then the grim warlord Halfdane came to abduct him by force into the Realm of the Alfar.Now he was a virtual prisoner in the hill fort of Halfdane, caught in a bitter war between light and dark elves And he seemed trapped on the losing side His only hope was to escape and somehow learn what powerful magic was contained in the box and which everyone seemed bent on stealing from him.Of course, there were a few walking dead, a cursed sword, and a multitude of savage trolls to be faced But the strange wizard Jotull was willing oh, very willing to help him

    • Best Download [Elizabeth Boyer] ✓ The Wizard and the Warlord || [Classics Book] PDF ✓
      260 Elizabeth Boyer
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Elizabeth Boyer] ✓ The Wizard and the Warlord || [Classics Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Elizabeth Boyer
      Published :2018-08-26T00:24:53+00:00

    One thought on “The Wizard and the Warlord”

    1. The was written by the same author who wrote the book that last year I snarled at the Big D for trying to make me put it down. While this book wasn't snarling good, I still enjoyed it. One thing that makes it interesting is that it delves into Scandinavian mythos with using the gods or Valhalla, so you learn a little about the lessor known elements of Scandinavian lore.

    2. While the story’s conflict feels like a cautious shrug, it remains an interesting piece, with Scandinavian-myth inspired characters. Sigurd, the youngish protagonist, deals with the loss of his home and his beloved grandmother, only to be swept up with the very people she had warned him about. He struggles to understand a different world of magical folk immersed in a permanent war.The protagonist, Sigurd, is meant to fill the role of young, impetuous, reluctant hero, but seems maddeningly youn [...]

    3. I suspect I read this book before, because there were 2 scenes and one event that seemed familiar to me. Maybe I remembered what was in the box. Or maybe it was obvious. So the book must have managed to make a few lasting impressions while being otherwise utterly unmemorable. For those moments and the fact that I persevered this time through, this story gains its perhaps undeserved two stars. It's really hard to identify with a character who is so utterly immature, arrogant and stupid. He's surr [...]

    4. I bought this as a teenager and just decided to reread it. I still like the setting, a fantasy world based on Scandinavian mythology - there are Alfar and Trolls and restless dead men wandering from their graves. Unfortunately, the plot depends a little too much on the hero being kinda stubborn and thick. There were several points where I wanted to slap some sense into him. Admittedly, some of the other characters clearly had the same urge, so this wasn't bad writing but a deliberate choice. I s [...]

    5. I'm still trying to run down some of Ms. Boyer's novels. I found them first some years ago (like 20) and snatched up as many as I could find new and old and am still looking for them. These are great reads with great prose and I am close to giving them 5 each time, but feel they aren't quite up to the way I feel about say, Lord of the Rings or Deed of Paksenarrion. I'd go 4'5 if I couldd I "at least plan" to read them again. It sort of depends on available time.

    6. It has been over 20 years since I read it, and I still remember the basic storyline, so it must have had a lasting effect. While not a "deep" novel by any means, it was an entertaining read and I could empathize with the characters, though thinking on it now, the antagonists were definitely one-dimensional - evil just for the sake of being evil, rather than having some logical reasons behind that stance.

    7. Even more so than the previous volume (The Thrall and the Dragon's Heart), I just didn't care. This time, not even enough to finish it. I put it down, picked up another book instead, and went from "I kind of want to know how this ends better slog on" to "I want to know what happens on the next page, right now!". Then I remembered that's how reading is *supposed* to make me feel. Life's too short and my shelves too full for poor-to-mediocre books.

    8. Read this whole series as a teenager and loved it! I've been trying to think of the author's name for at least a month and it finally came to me yesterday!Medieval fantasy with a Scandinavian setting.

    9. Take the high rating on this one with a grain of salt. I read it when I was much younger and some amount of nostalgia may be coming into play.I might have to read it again, I remember it being really short.

    10. Pulp fantasy, yet something about it is worth a 4 rather than a 3. Maybe it was because I read this a long time ago?

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