Strange Peaches

Strange Peaches A TV western star quits his successful series and returns to Dallas to make a documentary film that reveals the truth about his home town His quest forces him to learn if he is capable of using his si

  • Title: Strange Peaches
  • Author: Edwin Shrake
  • ISBN: 9780877190769
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Paperback
  • A TV western star quits his successful series and returns to Dallas to make a documentary film that reveals the truth about his home town His quest forces him to learn if he is capable of using his six gun for real as he moves from booze and radical politics in oil men s palaces into the infamous Carousel Club and the underworld of arms and dope smuggling in a city ripe fA TV western star quits his successful series and returns to Dallas to make a documentary film that reveals the truth about his home town His quest forces him to learn if he is capable of using his six gun for real as he moves from booze and radical politics in oil men s palaces into the infamous Carousel Club and the underworld of arms and dope smuggling in a city ripe for the murder of a President.

    • Best Download [Edwin Shrake] ☆ Strange Peaches || [Nonfiction Book] PDF ↠
      422 Edwin Shrake
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Edwin Shrake] ☆ Strange Peaches || [Nonfiction Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Edwin Shrake
      Published :2018-05-07T02:57:21+00:00

    One thought on “Strange Peaches”

    1. One of the best novels written about Texas, a first-hand account of Dallas during the time of the Kennedy Assassination. Here's some of what I wrote about Bud Shrake's "Strange Peaches" in my book Texas Literary Outlaws:Bud Shrake’s Dallas novel, a full-throttle roar through the months leading up to the Kennedy assassination, was published in May 1972. The dust jacket describes Strange Peaches as "a novel about the making of a modern outlaw," and the cover portrays a peach—with a marijuana p [...]

    2. What a strange and brilliant book! I read 'Strange Peaches' based on the recommendation of a friend who clearly knows my taste. Excellent blending of fact and fiction with a brisk writing style that really keeps the pace captivating. This is one of those books you truly can't put down once you start reading it.

    3. I'm sad that I had never heard of Bud Shrake until he died last week because this really is a fine and underappreciated piece of Texas fiction. I was reminded at times of Hunter S. Thompson, Thomas Pynchon, and Joan Didion, but I think if I were forced to write a blurb about the book, I would say that it reads like Robert Altman's lost version of the JFK assassination, if that makes any sense.

    4. Ordered this book after reading Shrake's "Land of the Permanent Wave." I read the first couple of pages this afternoon before turning to other matters, and I'm hooked. I don't often read fiction, but I'm really looking forward to this one.

    5. This book should really be made into a film. It was absolutely emotionally exhausting but funny enough to keep me amused.

    6. One of the best JFK assasination books around, even if it's fiction. I mean, most of the other ones are fiction, too, right?

    7. Enjoyed this novel set in Dallas right around the time Kennedy was assassinated. At times it got a bit plodding and there's really no reason it needed 400+ pages. But atmospherically was at times really great. Favorite line: "Anybody who does ever'thing he says he's going to do is short on imagination."

    8. An interesting read. It was brillant at times and frustrating at others. Another review compared it with a Robert Altman film. I agree. Starts in Dallas and ends in Mexico. Way to many drug induced episodes for my taste, but it kept my attention. Shrake had a way with words.

    9. Wacky and muddled. It seems like Shrake didn't know when to stop. Honestly, I can't remember half of this novel Kind of reminds me of Jack Kerouac's On the Road in that way.

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