Expanded Universe

Expanded Universe The Wit and Wisdom of Robert A Heinlein author of multiple New York Times best sellers on subjects ranging from Crime and Punishment to the Love life of the American Teenager from Nuclear Power to t

  • Title: Expanded Universe
  • Author: Robert A. Heinlein
  • ISBN: 9780743499156
  • Page: 265
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Wit and Wisdom of Robert A Heinlein, author of multiple New York Times best sellers, on subjects ranging from Crime and Punishment to the Love life of the American Teenager from Nuclear Power to the Pragmatics of Patriotism from Prophecy to Destiny from Geopolitic to Post Holocaust America from the Nature of Courage to the Nature of Reality it s all here and it sThe Wit and Wisdom of Robert A Heinlein, author of multiple New York Times best sellers, on subjects ranging from Crime and Punishment to the Love life of the American Teenager from Nuclear Power to the Pragmatics of Patriotism from Prophecy to Destiny from Geopolitic to Post Holocaust America from the Nature of Courage to the Nature of Reality it s all here and it s all great straight from the mind of the finest science fiction writer of them all But beware after reading it, you too will occupy an Expanded Universe Contents 1 Foreword fw Destinies Spr 80 4 Life Line ss Astounding Aug 39 28 Successful Operation Heil , as by Lyle Monroe ss Futuria Fantasia Apr 40 34 Blowups Happen na Astounding Sep 40 92 Solution Unsatisfactory as by Anson MacDonald nv Astounding May 41 145 The Last Days of the United States ar 163 How to Be a Survivor ar 175 Pie from the Sky ar 181 They Do It with Mirrors as by Simon York ss Popular Detective May 47 207 Free Men nv The Worlds of Robert A Heinlein, Ace, 1966 237 No Bands Playing, No Flags Flying ss Vertex Dec 73 244 A Bathroom of Her Own ss 267 On the Slopes of Vesuvius ss 276 Nothing Ever Happens on the Moon nv Boys Life Apr 49 309 Pandora s Box revised from Where To , Galaxy Feb 52 ar The Worlds of Robert A Heinlein, Ace, 1966 315 Where To pm 316 Where To ar Galaxy Feb 52 354 Cliff and the Calories ss, 1950 372 Ray Guns and Rocket Ships ar The School Library Association of California Bulletin Nov 52 379 The Third Millennium Opens As I See Tomorrow ar Amazing Apr 56 386 Who Are the Heirs of Patrick Henry ar Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph Apr 13 58 403 Pravda Means Truth ar The American Mercury Oct 60 418 Inside Intourist ar, 1960 446 Searchlight vi Scientific American Aug 62 458 The Pragmatics of Patriotism sp United States Naval Academy Apr 5 73 as Channel Markers , Analog Jan 74 471 Paul Dirac, Antimatter, and You ar The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1975 494 Larger Than Life A Memoir in Tribute to Dr Edward E Smith ar 500 Spinoff ar 514 The Happy Days Ahead ar

    Star Wars Legends Wookieepedia FANDOM powered by Wikia The early development of the Expanded Universe was sporadic and unrefined, in large part because, at this time, there was so little canon material for the creators to use as reference Much of the early EU material from the early s contained analogies to the real world, which belied the The Star Wars Expanded Universe Timeline The STAR WARS EXPANDED UNIVERSE TIMELINE This chronology follows the original and only canon of the Star Wars saga dubbed Legends by Disney. How Disney Has Plundered the Star Wars Expanded Universe The Star Wars Expanded Universe lives on in the new movies and shows, for better and worse Here s how Lucasfilm continues to borrow from it. Shop Contest Kingdom Hearts Expanded Universe, Winners A teen boy, a giant key, and all of our lovable Disney favorites make up the basis of the Kingdom Hearts universe Together, we made it a whole lot bigger. Star Wars X wing book series Rogue Squadron is the first novel in the Star Wars X wing series It was written by Michael A Stackpole It is set at the beginning of the New Republic era of the Star Wars universe and centers on the creation of a new Rogue Squadron by legendary Rebel Alliance pilot Wedge Antilles. Robert Heinlein s Expanded Universe Volume Robert Heinlein s Expanded Universe Volume One Kindle edition by Robert A Heinlein Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Robert Heinlein s Expanded Universe Volume One. A Brief History of the Star Wars Expanded Universe A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away there was a very special place where countless books, comics, and video games all lived under the same canon Spanning millennia, these tales allowed Expansion of the universe The expansion of the universe is the increase of the distance between two distant parts of the universe with time It is an intrinsic expansion whereby the scale of space itself changes.The universe does not expand into anything and does not require space to exist outside it Technically, neither space nor objects in space move. site RAH The Robert A Heinlein Home Page If you re looking for information about science fiction grand master Robert A Heinlein and his works, you ve come to the right place. DC is officially stepping away from its expanded cinematic Sep , It s no secret that DC s cinematic universe efforts have experienced some difficulties winning the hearts of both fans and critics The exception has been the most recent entry in the

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    1. Foreword (Expanded Universe) • (1980) • essay by Robert A. HeinleinLife-Line • [Future History] • (1939) • short story by Robert A. HeinleinSuccessful Operation • (1940) • short story by Robert A. HeinleinBlowups Happen • [Future History] • (1940) • novelette by Robert A. HeinleinSolution Unsatisfactory • (1941) • novelette by Robert A. HeinleinThe Last Days of the United States • (1980) • essay by Robert A. HeinleinHow to Be a Survivor • (1980) • essay by Robert [...]

    2. Most of the short fiction in this volume I have read in other collections - so mainly I read this for the non-fiction. The stories are a little interesting, but for most people, feel free to skip this, unless you are super anal and have to read EVERYTHING by your favorite authors.Most of the tales start out on one track, but devolve into a 70-something year old guy complaining - Todays kids are stupid, foreign countries try to rob tourists, money doesnt mean anything if not backed by gold, and e [...]

    3. Short stories and essays presented chronologically. A couple of short stories are hard to find elsewhere, but the best ones can be found in other volumes. The book is filled out with Heinlein's essays, which seem to get more and more out of touch as both he and the twentieth century age.

    4. Lots of fun miscellaneous writings from Heinlein, from a cabaret detective story to a boy scout lunar tale. There's quite a bit of nonfiction, mostly relating to nuclear power, nuclear armaments, patriotism, the armed forces, Russia, and the Cold War. A couple of essays detail the encounter with "pravda" ("truth") that Mr. and Mrs. Heinlein experienced in their trip to the Soviet Union in 1960. There are many prognostications, ranging from alarmingly accurate to quaint in showing their age. It's [...]

    5. Of all the Heinlein I have read, this was by far his weakest collection, and one of the worst books I've read. I'm so glad it was free, because if I'd paid even 10 cents for this book, I'd want my money back.

    6. I just realized the irony of deciding to stop reading this on Memorial Day, given all of the pro-military jingoism on display in many of Heinlein's essays. I swear it wasn't intentional -- I just coincidentally figured out today that about half of these 500+ pages were ideologically conservative non-fiction instead of the sci-fi short stories I was expecting. I have no personal need for that paranoid tripe, especially when a solid majority of Heinlein's political and technological predictions we [...]

    7. Mainly nonfiction and fairly uninteresting short stories. I never realized how much of a pro military pro police state neoconservative heinlein wasnce the bulk of this book came from 5 hat perspective I found it quite unpleasant. I really liked the last part of the final essay, where he briefly switches to fiction and gas a president solve all the pathetic problems of the usa in just a few years with a radically common sense approach. Reading it, you almost think it could work. Ended the book on [...]

    8. W Rating : BThis was a fun book. This was Heinlein's Rivan Codex. Many non sci fi stories and papers Heinlein has written with his own personal comments throughout. Read if you like Heinlein and/or getting author jokes.

    9. Great collection of early stories and articles and commentaries on them. Shows the development of Heinlein as a writer.

    10. 50/100 Можна сказати що мене трусило від фразочок цитую дослівно "Аллан, загони баб в угол, чтобы под ногами не путались!", "в Аллане заговорил здравый смысл, -"бабам показывать не стоит, напугаются дуры"", а те як круті мужики вибирають собі самиць, і дають їм імена, або і не даютьн [...]

    11. The Heinlein tome! Some really great stories in here. I enjoyed the forewords and afterwords, which gave great insight into the mind of Heinlein. His opinions on education are well-founded, but a bit misguided.

    12. Like Time Enough for Love, I gathered many quotes from this book. It cemented for me that Heinlein was more futurist than science-fiction author, simply a futurist whose outlet was fictional more than directly predictional.

    13. Considered Heinlein's greatest compendium. Spanning 1939-1980. Took me a month to go through the 600 pages.

    14. When it stuck to SF, this was a good collection, but, alas, Heinlein felt he needed to insert non-fiction segments.

    15. The book is a bit dated. However, it gives good insight into the thinking about the A-bomb just after WWII.

    16. I got my start on Heinlein when I was about ten years old, and sometime between ten and fourteen I picked up EU and then shelved it because the essays were not the action adventure and daring-do of Glory Road, or Tunnel in the Sky. The politics, philosophy etc. were lost on me at the time. This time around things are different.I've read some of the previous reviews of this work, and am frankly disappointed that people who claim to be Heinlein fans, to appreciate Heinlein, would be turned off by [...]

    17. This is the book I've always wanted from Heinlein. Most of the pieces in here are essays, and they're full of such aggravation that I could read them forever. He was very progressive for his time, so it's interesting to read something from him that wasn't his usual Trojan horse into his readers minds. In these pieces, he flat-out speaks his mind, and it's an amazing thing to behold. My favorite has to be "Pie from the Sky," in which he once again tries to save the world from nuclear annihilation [...]

    18. I remember loving this book in my teens, and I still consider Robert A Heinlein one of my favorite authors, but if you’re not a fan already, I wouldn’t recommend this book to begin with. This contains 27 of Heinlein’s short pieces, of which about half are essays, but it’s not a collection of his best, nor one that say pulls together all his “Future History” stories such as The Past Through Tomorrow, which would make a good introduction. There are a few strong stories here. For a work [...]

    19. As I recall, only the initial tale, "Universe" is any good, but it is a must-read for all those interested in the possibility of interstellar travel. Asimov thought we couldn't do it. Clarke came to believe that rapid interstellar travel remained a fantasy. Bradbury seemed not interested in the phenomenon. Stargate I, the TV sci-fi channel's uptake of Fred Pohl's Gateway concept, acknowledges by its silence on the matter the impossibility of "getting there" without taking advantage of some bridg [...]

    20. Expanded Universe is a collection of short stories and other publications. Some of the shorts have been published in other collections. Most of the other stuff I thought was just a little boring, although, probably more interesting during the time it was actually published. He writes a lot about Atomics and what-if scenarios for a WWIII situation. Most of these publications were written after WWII when Hiroshima was still on a lot of peoples minds. The two articles I believe are must reads are " [...]

    21. Robert Heilnlein must've been a curmudgeonly old fart from the day he was born. A grandmaster of SF and a founding father of the genre, Heinlein loved to hear himself pontificate on the state of the country and the ills of society. His views on voting ( voting is not a right but a privelege that should be earned ) are particularly worrisome. As Isaac Asimov said, any system where a voter must prove himself worthy is problematic -just who decides whether you are worthy enough to enter the booth?B [...]

    22. Interesting look back to see how RAH's outlook changed and didn't change over the years. Fascinating description of a Soviet trip. Some of the stories I already read in "The Past Through Tomorrow" . And a story about a black woman nominated to be eye candy for a presidential candidate, who wins. After the president is killed in the first 10 days of office, she takes over, to the chagrin of the "machine", and turns Washington DC upside down - and reinstates the gold standard. You could see this h [...]

    23. This is a fun book that expands greatly on Heinlein as a writer. Most only know him for Stranger in a Strange Land and/or Starship Troopers, but the Expanded Universe shows him as writing in many more genres and being as much of a progressive (though possibly less of an activist) as Orwell. I enjoyed his fiction much more than his (as we know now, post-Cold War) paranoid rantings about the impending destruction of the US by nuclear holocaust, but to see his dire warnings give an interesting pers [...]

    24. This is a great book that contains both fiction and non-fiction stories. Each one has a foreword or an afterword that explains what compelled Heinlein to write it or how he felt about the story later. The book gives great insight into Heinlen's way of thinking and his beliefs; and—as a relatively young reader of 27—I found it also gives insights into the life and beliefs of people in the 50s–80s era; especially the non-fiction stories about Heinlen's experience during visits to the USSR> [...]

    25. Obviously not my first time through this book (well, obvious to me); it's been a good long time since I've re-read it in full. "Cliff and the Calories" is still my favorite and I wish that someone had put together that collection of Puddin' stories, if only for my teen-self. I laughed out loud when I realized that both my major and my minor at university were courses of study which Heinlein denounced (but leave it as an exercise to the reader to suss out what those might have been), but I think [...]

    26. Not a greatest hits like The Past Through Tomorrow, from which 3 early stories are duplicated here, but a sampling of previously uncollected largely non-fiction pieces. This volume provided the first real glimpse of his breath of knowledge which informed his story writing. Some pieces are far more technical than you've been used to seeing from him, and those may cause the less informed in those areas to pass over parts. But nonetheless, an important piece of the puzzle was revealed within these [...]

    27. I would recommend Expanded Universe for anyone wanting a collection of Robert Heinlein’s earliest work and to gain further insight into his thoughts and feelings on a variety of topics, from atomic bombs to zodiacs. Robert prefaces each story with a brief description of what he was doing at the time or what his inspiration was. A few of the articles are autobiographic such as “Pravda Means Truth”, and “Inside Intourist”. When read with “Grumbles from the Grave,” Expanded Universe p [...]

    28. Some is quite goode background parentheticals are always interesting, and the two essays on tourism in the USSR (really!) are brilliant reads. His early writings on the bomb are really clear and prescient and it's still amazing that we just sort of muddled through (and still haven't solved the problem). By the later essays he's gotten a fair bit bombastic and with an excessive confidence that mirrors his decrease in information. His projections of technology are one thing; the projections of soc [...]

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