The Goose Girl

The Goose Girl This is a pre historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digiti

  • Title: The Goose Girl
  • Author: Harold MacGrath
  • ISBN: 9781426481161
  • Page: 141
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is a pre 1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process Though we have made best efforts the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience We believe this work is culturally importanThis is a pre 1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process Though we have made best efforts the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ The Goose Girl | by ↠ Harold MacGrath
      141 Harold MacGrath
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      Posted by:Harold MacGrath
      Published :2018-011-21T04:04:59+00:00

    One thought on “The Goose Girl”

    1. This is classic dramatic fiction of the type that was so popular at the turn of the 20th century American going into an unnamed Eastern European, Germanic country to tilt at windmills and embroil himself in local politics and fall in love in the process. There are a great many twists, and much less lovemaking and tilting at windmills than some such fiction. There are spies to be found, and a crime of a generation ago to be atoned for. Who really stole the Duke's daughter? Have they finally found [...]

    2. Cute story and it kept me guessing to the end but I'm not sure if that because the mystery really was good or because I kept mentally comparing it to Shannon Hale's The Goose Girl and getting confused! But I did enjoy it!

    3. "e poor were generally poor because of their incapabilities, their ignorance, and incompetence." Woah there! A ridiculously classist romance featuring abducted princesses! spies! tense conversations at balls! The writing is good, but the plot is a little too laughable for my taste.

    4. I liked the story line. I read that this story is based on a fairy tale. It read like an old fashioned fairy tale. There were kings, a princess, spies and talk of war between the kingdoms. There were a lot of characters introduced in the first chapter. They all had different titles in their name. It really muddled the plot and was confusing to read. It was also predictable. I had this one figured out at 50 percent finished. Maybe I read too many fairy tales when I was a kid. I knew the poor litt [...]

    5. The Goose Girl, by Harold MacGrath, is a sweet romance/fairy tale historical fiction set in a German duchy in maybe the 19th century. The plot basically follows a peasant girl and a vintner who are planning to marry, while an American consul, who looks out for the peasant girl when he can, pines after the princess of the duchy, who dreads being married off, and an old man comes to town to clear his conscience. Obviously there’s slightly more to it than that, but I don’t want to spoil anythin [...]

    6. A perfect princess romance story and Harold Macgrath writes it beautifully. He also made this (and plenty other books) into silent films. Unfortunately it is one of the many missing ones but we can clearly imagine what it could have been. Macgrath is clear when describing scenes and emotions but I did get little confused in who was who the various different titles didn't help. Putting that aside, a very pleasant read.

    7. I like to peruse old book stores and I think this may be an original, published in 1909, edition. I've no idea how to rate this book yet, since I'm only a few pages in. Bought it simply because it's old and looked charming. It's the first book I've opened since I finished my degree in English Lit at BYU last month! I was a bit burned out and chose this one off my shelves on a whim.

    8. This is a great story of mistaken identity.I enjoyed how the author brought in the story from various different points of view and each leaving enough of the story a mystery to keep you reading.Although I had an idea of how the book would end, there still was a lot let as mystery.I really enjoyed this book.

    9. I picked this one up at a yard sale and surprisingly loved it! Although the end was a bit predictable, it was a SWEET read! You will enjoy it! (I just may add this one to my personal, classic read list!)

    10. I could not put the page-turner down! Though somewhat predictable, I remained surprised and completely captivated as each portion of the mystery unfolded. Such a fun period romantic mystery story!! Quick, fun read :)

    11. A pleasant, light fairy tale set in a fictional 19th century european duchy. Nothing terribly deep. Just enjoyable.MacGrath wrote many adventure/romance/mystery action tales around the turn of the 20th century. This one was made into a film in 1915.

    12. sweet little book, it did feel that it started in the middle and took me awhile to pick it up. the ending also seemed tad lacking, but had an overall nice feel to it.

    13. like the princess bride!! romantic mistaken identity! this time i was able to see a little better the time setting. Just after the civil war. huh.

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