American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century

American Moderns Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century A brilliant account of the legary American bohemians hailed as the best book ever written about this era these people and the ways they shook up our national culture for good Michael Kazin In the e

  • Title: American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century
  • Author: Christine Stansell
  • ISBN: 9780805067354
  • Page: 178
  • Format: Paperback
  • A brilliant account of the legary American bohemians, hailed as the best book ever written about this era, these people, and the ways they shook up our national culture for good Michael Kazin In the early years of the twentieth century, an exuberant band of talented individualists living in a shabby neighborhood called Greenwich Village set out to change the world CommA brilliant account of the legary American bohemians, hailed as the best book ever written about this era, these people, and the ways they shook up our national culture for good Michael Kazin In the early years of the twentieth century, an exuberant band of talented individualists living in a shabby neighborhood called Greenwich Village set out to change the world Committed to free speech, free love, and politically engaged art, they swept away sexual prudery, stodgy bourgeois art, and political conservatism as they clamorously declared the birth of the new.Christine Stansell offers the first comprehensive history of this legary period She takes us deep into the downtown bohemia, which brought together creative dissenters from all walks of life hoboes and Harvard men, society matrons and immigrant Jews, Wobblies and New Women, poets and anarchists And she depicts their lyrical hopes for the century they felt they were sponsoring a radiant vision of modernity, both egalitarian and artful, that flourished briefly, poignantly, until America entered the First World War and patriotism trumped self expression.

    • Best Read [Christine Stansell] ☆ American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century || [History Book] PDF ã
      178 Christine Stansell
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Christine Stansell] ☆ American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century || [History Book] PDF ã
      Posted by:Christine Stansell
      Published :2018-09-19T04:05:49+00:00

    One thought on “American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century”

    1. The last chapter was the best part of the book. "Loving America with Open Eyes" describes what happened to the left with the coming of WWI. With the enactment of the Espionage Act and the Sedition Act, along with the earlier Comstock Laws, the voice of the left was shut down.

    2. Magisterial.Christine Stansell argues that a number of modern ideas developed in Bohemian New York during the first decades of the twentieth century and then passed out to the culture at large--before the Bohemia itself withered, another victim of World War II. In its scope and command of material, it is impressive. The book has an underlying logic to its organization--one that is even old-fashioned and rooted in the academic--but it is disguised enough that it reads well. This is not narrative [...]

    3. Focused on turn of the century New York City, Christine Stansell’s work, American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century offers insight into the creation of bohemian culture and the area known today as Greenwich Village. Stansell’s work is foremost a character study. Focusing on thematic organization Stansell is able to highlight key players of the Bohemian movement in a relatively narrow time period. Her work is not a mere chronological study of downtown New York, but [...]

    4. Stansell presents a long, biographically-driven story of the "intelligentsia" of the Left wing lifestyle politics-- the Bohemians who would become Greenwich Villagers over time--the people who were movers and shakers behind the idealization of New Woman discussions before the New Woman of the 1920s became widely popular. This was a world of free love (open marriages, marriages of non-cohabitation, and others cohabitating and not marriage) and of IWW advocacy, and generally of disobedience before [...]

    5. I was excited when I first saw this book on my reading list the title reminded me of a book I read Nights out: Life in cosmopolitan London (which came out after American Moderns). I was expecting a similar book, but set in NY. While the book was very interesting, particularly the section on "The Human Sex," it did not make my favorites' list. I was not expecting a book filled with mini-biographies on individuals and found it difficult at first to keep track of all the characters. I found the ind [...]

    6. Stansell explores the world of New York Bohemia at the turn of the 20th century – a multicultural world of intellectuals, immigrants, Wobblies, women, artist, and anarchists. Heavily influenced by European literature, politically engaged New York bohemians devoted to free speech and free love, as well as the creation of a new modern culture. Not surprisingly considering Stansell’s work on urban women and sexuality, the book focuses of the socio-sexual liberation of women. It was ok; I enjoye [...]

    7. The backstory to the movie Reds, which I saw as a teenager and which I'm sure played a significant role in my becoming a historian. Not as engrossing as the movie, and I found the organization rather clunky and a little repetitive in places, but generally interesting. I especially appreciated the subtheme of performance: the major players all engaged in some form of self-dramatization, either through writing or talking (conversation, speeches, dramatic performances).I do have to admit, though, t [...]

    8. See, there were these folks in Greenwich Village who had great parties and lots of great uncomplicated (or so they thought) sex, and they might have changed the world, but then WWI happened. My parents went to their parties, and all I got was this lousy book.

    9. Who knew Davenport, Iowa had an imprtant and big boho culture? I liked this book a lot, especially the parts on Randolph Bourne.

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