City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860

City of Women Sex and Class in New York How women emerged as a distinctive class in the burgeoning society of New York City in the postCivil War era is explored from an original viewpoint in this interesting study Female class relations la

  • Title: City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860
  • Author: Christine Stansell
  • ISBN: 9780252014819
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Paperback
  • How women emerged as a distinctive class in the burgeoning society of New York City in the postCivil War era is explored from an original viewpoint in this interesting study Female class relations, ladies and working women, were symbiotic The laborers had their sexual and social demeanor regulated by their middle class sisters, who had the leisure to act as self apHow women emerged as a distinctive class in the burgeoning society of New York City in the postCivil War era is explored from an original viewpoint in this interesting study Female class relations, ladies and working women, were symbiotic The laborers had their sexual and social demeanor regulated by their middle class sisters, who had the leisure to act as self appointed exemplars of virtue The women of the working class come to life in Stansell s identification of their lot Adrift from family ties, they entered the labor force, many resorting to prostitution and crime, which provoked the philanthropy of genteel bourgeois women, social reformers and the rise of the settlement house movement The neighborhoods of the poor, the tenements and bawdy houses of 19th century New York are portrayed as important elements in women s history Stansell teaches at Princeton University.

    • Best Read [Christine Stansell] ☆ City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860 || [Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      317 Christine Stansell
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Christine Stansell] ☆ City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860 || [Fiction Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Christine Stansell
      Published :2018-012-27T18:20:08+00:00

    One thought on “City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860”

    1. A meticulously documented, well-articulated social history of the politics of gender and labor in antebellum New York. Originally published in 1986, City of Women was quite novel in approach at the time, while its deconstruction of traditional narratives (male centered, universalist) belongs to the first wave of gender histories. Yes, as I write this in 2015, it may seem that there's nothing new to be gleaned here, but one must keep in mind that that's because of research like this which propell [...]

    2. An important exploration of working-class women's positions in the urban landscape of the nineteenth century, in particular as it related to revolutionary and post-revolutionary ideals of republicanism. Stansell seeks to correct earlier histories, which cast female workers as “either feminine versions of working-class men or working-class versions of middle-class women,” as victims who occasionally and inexplicably revolted, but were mostly passive.Initially, the American ideology of republi [...]

    3. In 1405 Christine de Pizan completed her most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies, in which she defended the virtues and contributions of women against demeaning yet popular contemporary depictions. Christine Stansell’s similarly titled City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860, evokes a similar spirit and, in its own way, continues Pizan’s mission of raising awareness to the contributions of otherwise neglected women. Stansell’s subject is the laboring women of antebellu [...]

    4. Stansell describes the lives of working-class women in New York City between 1789 and 1860. There are very few resources from women during this time period which posed a challenge to Stansell, but she was still able to provide an in-depth look into the lives of working-class women. Stansell describes how new jobs available outside of the home, challenged ideas of patriarchy in the early United States and gave women more freedom and opportunities.

    5. Excerpted as "The Geography of Vice" in Gary Kornblith, ed The Industrial Revolution in America (1998)In her study of female reformers in New York City during the first half of the 19th Century, Stansell demonstrates that class loyalties were stronger than gender loyalties for the women who reached out to the City's poor. Female reformers were middle class first and women second. Though they empathized with poor women as mothers, their reform efforts did little to meet the poor women they minist [...]

    6. While I do believe this is an important book describing how women lived in New York City, many parts of the book were repetitive. I really felt as though the author made her point without having to use five different examples about a specific thing. This happened in the portion about prostitutes, I think that the point was made early on in the section, but the author continually brought up the same facts about why women turned to that profession. Because of this, it didn't feel cohesive at times [...]

    7. Detailed but approachable history of women in ninteenth-century New York focusing on the development of the "cult of domesticity" among the bourgeoisie and the ways in which this development harmed and helped the economic aspirations of working- and lower-class women. The major criticism of this book--and one I agreee with--is that it largely ignores differences and conflicts among women in New York's various immigrant communities in favor of its more exclusively class-focused approach. Addition [...]

    8. This was a very good book. It's about the formation of the female working class in New York, distinct from and in tandem with the male working class and the female genteel class. A running theme is women's dependency on men, and how they were the most at risk of destitution if abandoned by men or widowed (because they were so poorly paid as workers). Another is working-class men's paternalism, which limited labor solidarity and furthering women's struggle as workers. Does a good job describing w [...]

    9. What could have been a stultifying statistical data dump turned out to be a compelling study illuminating the lives of working class and poor women in NYC in the "between the wars" period (in this case, the Revolutionary War and the Civil War). There is no lack of scholarship (or of data) but Stansell leavens the necessary dough with individual case studies whenever possible. City of Women is both an elegant piece of historical scholarship and a readable story. I would be interested in reading u [...]

    10. I would have to say that this work is quite remarkable in its revolutionary look at working class women's experiences and the wonderful contributions this work made to thinking about history and women's place in it. However, reading it from a historian's standpoint in 2008, it seems like it's all things I have heard before as pretty standard women's history. I appreciate its significance to history, but it didn't really further my thinking.

    11. Reads much like a textbook, however it is another interesting history book of mine. It makes you proud that women have so much more power today, and a chance to stand up for themselves. It made me feel so grateful that I live in a time when women have a chance to provide for themselves,as well as represent themselves as citizens.

    12. By the time this book began to really grip me, it was nearly over. Though throughout it proved to be a fascinating look at a woman torn between what is right, and what is required. Showing the strength it takes to open ones eyes to the injustices of the world and do something about it, accepting great personal risk.

    13. * Understanding Oppression: Women's Rights (Then and Now)Excellent study of working-class women in New York City--essential reading for understanding the interplay between labor history and emerging ideas about gender roles during this period. #gender #politics #history #americas #nyc

    14. Not incredibly boring, although it is almost entirely about the lower classes. Some of the chapters were quite interesting.

    15. Excellent study of working-class women in New York City--essential reading for understanding the interplay between labor history and emerging ideas about gender roles during this period.

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