Симпсоны и их математические секреты

  • Title: Симпсоны и их математические секреты
  • Author: Simon Singh
  • ISBN: 9785001000341
  • Page: 148
  • Format: Paperback
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      Posted by:Simon Singh
      Published :2018-08-16T23:30:35+00:00

    One thought on “Симпсоны и их математические секреты”

    1. For everyone who has watched it, The Simpsons means a lot of things: long running animated show, brilliant social satire, pop culture phenomenon, an amazing cast of characters, irreverent humour. But steady source of ingenious math references? It’s safe to say that the majority of viewers would say, unequivocally, no. Simon Singh, a great popularizer of math and science, aims to turn that misconception on its head for readers of his excellent book, The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets. [...]

    2. While my obsession with the Simpson's has waned over the years this book is a reminder of what made me unwittingly fall in love with this show. The author's obsession with the show makes me feel/look like an amateur. ;-)Simon Singh does a fantastic job (the book reads like he thoroughly enjoyed it too) of uncovering gems from this show. From the "Treehouse of Horror VI" Calculus joke (yeah I completely missed this one!) to the very famous Fermat's last theorem. It you are interested in Mathemati [...]

    3. What a boring, boring audiobook. Here’s pretty much how every chapter is structured:^ A paragraph or 2 about a specific Simpsons episode’s math reference (a lot of the text being the episode’s name repeated many, many times)A few pages about the script writers’ math pedigree and whom they know in the math community, with maybe a call back to the show’s reference.Pages and pages of detailed math history that goes from minutia to brain-dead simple.Then a quick paragraph to conclude and r [...]

    4. Who'd have thought that a family based cartoon series would have so many maths links, but it turns out the Simpsons does. A significant number of the script writers on the Simpsons have some form of maths or science background, and arrived at the studios having either dropped out or after post doc studies.In this book Singh introduces us to them, and some of their backgrounds, as well as outlining many of the ways that they have sneaked maths puzzles and jokes into the scripts and illustrations. [...]

    5. The Simpsons is an animated sitcom about a fictional "middle American" family. The series has been running since 1989 and is currently airing their 27th season. I haven't watched this show for many years now, but there was a time when I used to be obsessed with the show. I used to trawl over the internet in my quest to search for hidden and obscure references that appeared on the show, and for their meanings. One of the earliest references was from the first episode when baby Maggie stacks her a [...]

    6. One of my favorite jokes of The Simpsons happens to be a Math joke. This is odd because I absolutely detest Mathematics. I believe it was but on this Earth just to mock me but I digress. The joke, which is discussed in this book, is when Lisa discovers that nerds actually release a pheromone via their sweat glands that negatively attract bullies. This is a breakthrough and Lisa writes a paper about her findings. She is then invited to a big Science conference to present it. Everyone in the confe [...]

    7. I discovered The Simpsons in college and it took me binge watching handful of seasons to understand the nerdgasm that surrounds it. There is, of course, the representation of a family residing in suburbia and their everyday interactions with townsfolk. But it is the little things that the writers put there that makes this show stand apart from its contemporaries and give it the strength to hold out on its own for more than two decades. In a way, The Simpsons has been around a little less than as [...]

    8. Simon Singh did and didn't take a different turn from his previous work, in my mind. I grew up captivated by The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography and Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem as both introductions and textbooks. This book is different, and so is the version of myself that is reading it. I was given this book as a gift, and that made it all of the more appropriate to read it for pleasure (laughte [...]

    9. I was watching some special features on a Futurama DVD and one was all about the hidden meanings in signs and numbers that appear in the background of the show. It seems that every number that appears has some mathematical significance. Hence, when I saw this book I was very intrigued.It turns out that the majority of the writers on the Simpsons and Futurama are big old nerdy-nerds with masters degrees in some form of science. Simon Singh went through a number of stories where certain writers ha [...]

    10. I love Maths and I really enjoyed other books by Simon Singh, but this book feels incoherent throughout. I kept thinking that this is the kind of book you'd have on a shelf by a toilet - something to glance at for a couple of minutes and then get on with your day. The stories don't flow well together, and it feels like he is racing to get every single mathematical (and some physics) nods that has ever happened in the Simpsons (and Futurama).Not a book to sit and read, but OK to flick through if [...]

    11. A rather scattershot book about some interesting bits of mathematics and the simpsons. Many of the simpsons writers have mathematics backgrounds. It is kind of fun to see some of the mathematical jokes incorporated and the math is cool but anyone who has a math background has seen much of it before but it could be entertaining to a simpsons fan who doesn't know about the math references hidden among popular culture references.

    12. I had heard several interviews with Simon Singh about this book when it came out, so I knew it would be a fun read, but it was much more enjoyable than I expected. I had it on the shelf for a while, however, because I was uncertain about whether the fact that I hadn't taken calculus for over a decade (and don't have much cause to use maths other than stats in my work) would detract from my enjoyment of the book. It most certainly didn't. For math geeks and math-phobes alike, this book certainly [...]

    13. this is more than a book of Simpsons trivia, it's a way to learn and refresh complex math concepts. I was genuinely excited about what I was learning, from theorems, to math history to the binary code for 666 (1010011010 from memory, ya!). while the actual Simpsons math references are mainly subtle freeze frame gags, the knowledge needed to understand the gags is fascinating. at the end of each section we get an "exam" or a set of math jokes. we pass the exam if the jokes make us laugh. I have s [...]

    14. Habla demasiado de matemáticas y poquillo de Los Simpson. Quizás no es muy adecuado para alguien no matemático y algo aburrido para un fan de Los Simpson. Lo mejor es la parte que habla de Futurama.

    15. Through the years we have had a whole slew of books dedicated to discovering the science or maths used in a fiction book, movie or TV show – think, for instance of The Physics of Star Trek or The Science of Middle Earth. And at first sight, Simon Singh’s new book (which he tells me has been brewing in his mind for a good few years) is more of the same, but in fact takes rather a different approach. Where the other books look for the science etc. inherent in the world created in the storyline [...]

    16. For those of us that love math, we’ve accepted that there will never be a popular television show targeted towards us. The Simpsons is our oasis. While it’s not intended solely for us, we probably appreciate it more than anyone. This book is a guide to the (arguably) best gags in television history, from geometry jokes to topology tomfoolery.I would like to say that Simon Singh wrote this book so that anyone can understand it, but that’s not entirely true. It’s more accurate to say that [...]

    17. Simon Singh writes clearly on a broad range of mathematical topics that left to lesser lights would inevitably result in obscurity, incomprehension and outright boredom. Although the book purports to be about the hidden relationship between the popular TV show the Simpsons and mathematics, in fact the plot line follows mostly the writers obsession with the world of mathematics. Hence, there is lots of serious math talk and little Simpsons-nesque shenanigans. Which is fine, because the value of t [...]

    18. This is a book that requires one to both like the Simpsons and math. The secrets are well hidden in the show, and sometimes a bit convoluted for the average Simpsons viewer. The math, after all, isn't the starring attraction of any prime-time show - let alone an animated comedic one. So someone grabbing this book hoping for low brow laughs will be disappointed. But for those, like me, that love science, math, bad puns, and clever animation, this was a fun read. Many of the writers for the Simpso [...]

    19. How do you make anything much less funny? Explain the jokes. This was boring as fuck.Here's a very accurate review by Jheurf:Here’s pretty much how every chapter is structured:^A paragraph or 2 about a specific Simpsons episode’s math reference (a lot of the text being the episode’s name repeated many, many times) A few pages about the script writers’ math pedigree and whom they know in the math community, with maybe a call back to the show’s reference. Pages and pages of detailed math [...]

    20. I have read a couple of books by Simon Singh and have enjoyed his style of writing and describing math and science to a general audience. This book is no exception - here we find out that many of the writers on the SImpsons and Futurama have advanced degrees in subjects like Match, Physics and Computer Science, but make their living writing comedy in Hollywood. They never forgot their academic roots and try to put as much math as possible into the Simpsons. Singh takes us through many different [...]

    21. The Simpsons is one of my favorite shows. I grew up watching it every day (except Saturdays, the dark day devoid of Simpsons reruns). Of course I'm going to love a book that has anything to do with The Simpsons.The first thing I learned is that many people on the show's writing staff have advanced degrees in mathematics or computer science, which is fascinating in itself. And it certainly explains why the show has made so many mathematical references and jokes that I never noticed before. I love [...]

    22. Wow, thoroughly enjoyed this book. I originally thought Simpsons was just another witty animated series, but after reading this book, I can see the mathematical geniuses behind its creation and amount of thought that has gone into creating each episode as well as educating the public about mathematics, in an interesting way. One does not need to have a good mathematical knowledge to understand this book, and those who love mathematics will enjoy it. The author has done a very good job in writing [...]

    23. This book combines two of my favorite things – The Simpsons and math. How can I not like it? And furthermore, Simon Singh is an awesome writer.This book is a pretty light read. I finished it in three days of non-intensive reading. It follows a pretty straightforward formula. It tells stories behind the curtains of The Simpsons, it points out and explains a few mathematical jokes, it tells a few interesting stories from the world of math and then it repeats. There is even a section on Futurama, [...]

    24. This very quick read is neither complete (there are websites for that, referenced in the introduction) nor comprehensive (it can be sold to those without a math PhD). It was enjoyable.Each chapter starts with a reference or three from the Simpsons (and later Futurama) then moves forward to explore the mathematical concept referenced (from Pi and Fermat to Topologies and Klein Bottles, with a side trip into Bill James and Erdos/Bacon Numbers). The explorations are necessarily brief. Singh also in [...]

    25. So, it turns out that The Simpsons somehow attracted a group of writers who migrated to comedy after getting degrees in maths, physics, computer science and similarly "serious" topics. Which means that pretty much all the numbers that even briefly flash across the screen in different episodes are mathematically interesting or significant. Which is what this book describes, thoroughly but friendly-ly enough to cater to the less mathematically inclined reader. A cute collection of trivia, but ulti [...]

    26. As fascinating and appetite-whetting as it wants to be, I can't quite shake the feeling that it gets wrong what most other "Subject X in The Simpsons" gets wrong: it tries to argue that the central focus of the series is their pet subject, rather than try to show how all the different approaches poured into the series work together. Also, the Swedish translation is horrible. Just because someone knows how to translate pop-science books clearly doesn't mean they know how to translate comedy.

    27. I felt like this book could have gone down a really cheesy or bad path and tried to pull a bunch of mathematical references at a stretch within The Simpsons but it was not like that at all. I found this book to be really fun as it used The Simpsons and Futurama to talk a bit about the history of mathematics and some of the interesting theorems and concepts relating to mathematics.It reminded me of how much I love mathematics and find it so fascinating. This was such a fun book.

    28. This was an enjoyable read, though at times we lost site of the actual mathematics in favor of discussing either tidbits from individual episodes or biographical details of the writers. However, the technical mathematical explanations were very informative to someone who took a lot of math in high school and early college, but who hasn't dealt with advanced mathematics for more than 10 years.

    29. One of the few good books I have read in clinched and uninteresting topics as this. Singh is outstanding inhis style to engage the reader and not make it a boring mathematical hodgepodge. Simon Singh's novels+ Google = Sheer Brlliance. His jokes are quite fun and a good novel overall.

    30. Після того, як дізнаєшся про цілу купу математичних пасхалок і хто стоїть за сценаріями до "Сімпсонів" і "Футурами", починаєш по інакшому дивитись на ці мультсеріали.Фанатам "Сімпсонів", "Футурами" і математики однозначно рекомендую!

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