The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932

The Perils of Prosperity Beginning with Woodrow Wilson and U S entry into World War I and closing with the Great Depression The Perils of Prosperity traces the transformation of America from an agrarian moralistic isolatio

  • Title: The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932
  • Author: William E. Leuchtenburg Daniel J. Boorstin
  • ISBN: 9780226473710
  • Page: 448
  • Format: Paperback
  • Beginning with Woodrow Wilson and U.S entry into World War I and closing with the Great Depression, The Perils of Prosperity traces the transformation of America from an agrarian, moralistic, isolationist nation into a liberal, industrialized power involved in foreign affairs in spite of itself.William E Leuchtenburg s lively yet balanced account of this hotly debated erBeginning with Woodrow Wilson and U.S entry into World War I and closing with the Great Depression, The Perils of Prosperity traces the transformation of America from an agrarian, moralistic, isolationist nation into a liberal, industrialized power involved in foreign affairs in spite of itself.William E Leuchtenburg s lively yet balanced account of this hotly debated era in American history has been a standard text for many years This substantial revision gives greater weight to the roles of women and minorities in the great changes of the era and adds new insights into literature, the arts, and technology in daily life He has also updated the lists of important dates and resources for further reading This book gives us a rare opportunity to enjoy the matured interpretation of an American Historian who has returned to the story and seen how recent decades have added meaning and vividness to this epoch of our history Daniel J Boorstin, from the Preface

    • ✓ The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932 || Ì PDF Read by ✓ William E. Leuchtenburg Daniel J. Boorstin
      448 William E. Leuchtenburg Daniel J. Boorstin
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      Posted by:William E. Leuchtenburg Daniel J. Boorstin
      Published :2018-08-04T21:22:35+00:00

    One thought on “The Perils of Prosperity, 1914-1932”

    1. Fascinating. A bit technical, but the specificity lent credibility where it was needed. Well worth the read!

    2. This book, a cultural history of the United States from World War I until the election of FDR in 1932, makes a fine precursor to the last book I read by this author,Franklin D Roosevelt and the New Deal. I hadn't know at the time of purchase (as they were bought separately) that they were by the same author, but it worked out pretty well, especially for anyone looking to find out more about how the Great Depression started since the other book tends to skip that a bit. While not as detailed as i [...]

    3. I had to read this for a college level history of American 1900-1945 class and it is overall an interesting and useful text. It chronicles the transition of America from agrarian to manufacturing. Leuchtenburg shows the divide between the country and the city; as one fights to stay alive, the other fights to evolve. The first half of the book focuses more so on the politics: World War I, the Treaty of Versailles, Wilson’s Fourteen Points, and the Red Scare. The second half details more of soci [...]

    4. I bought this $1.95 in (1958) book for $4.50 at O'Keefe's downtown yesterday and boy did I get a bargain! It is very pertinent to todays financial/social situation. A quote from the very last two sentences is as follows: "The United States in the period from 1914 to 1932 fell far short of working out viable solutions to the problems created by the painful transition from nineteenth-century to modern America. But it is, at the very least, charitable to remember that the country has not solved the [...]

    5. By the early 20th century America had begun to assert itself as a capitalist society. What Leuchtenberg does so brilliantly is to parse out how this really affected everyday people (including women, racial minorities, and other significant yet largely ignored sectors of the population), as well as how it affected broad policy issues (like foreign policy and prohibition). What makes this book truly amazing is its accessibility. It can easily be read and comprehended in a few sittings by any inter [...]

    6. Good reference for understanding the Jazz Age and subsequent Great Depression eras. Definitely skewed toward the liberal interpretation of history, especially concerning the effect of the Coolidge administration's tax policies and how Americans "worshiped" at the temple of business in the 1920s.

    7. It is really well written, a pleasant read if you want to get a feel for what life was like just before the great depression and if you want to learn a little about the Red Scare and WWI. The author claims in the book that historians have determined that Sacco and Venzetti were guilty after all, but this is not true (anymore?)

    8. Read for my film/history class. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. This was very well written and very informative. I learned so much about this time period that I knew very little about. I couldn’t get enough! Very glad my professor assigned it.

    9. A surprisingly good overview of American history from World War I to the Great Depression, though broad, selective and very concise. Written in the fifties, it is still a valid and useful survey, even if it is in some ways amusingly of its own era.

    10. A good account, but for most people, Frederick Lewis Allen's Only Yesterday is still a much more entertaining and useful account of the 1920s.

    11. So much about the 1920s seems eerily similar to today. Although written half a century ago, the book is still a good overview of political history of the period.

    12. An engaging history of the mass social changes of the 1920s in the United States. After the World War shattered illusions, there were rapid changes related to farm industrialization, radio, Fords, the skyline of New York City, and of course flapper girls.In the back, the author gives Suggested Reading: "Every account of this period begins with Frederick Lewis Allen, Only Yesterday (1931), a social history written in such a lively style that academicians often underrate its soundness.Morris's Not [...]

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