The Boy in the Earth

The Boy in the Earth Fuminori Nakamura s Akutagawa Prize winner plunges us into the depths of a young man s winding troubled psyche An unnamed taxi driver in Tokyo has experienced a rupture from his everyday life He cann

  • Title: The Boy in the Earth
  • Author: Fuminori Nakamura Allison Markin Powell
  • ISBN: 9781616955946
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Fuminori Nakamura s Akutagawa Prize winner plunges us into the depths of a young man s winding, troubled psyche.An unnamed taxi driver in Tokyo has experienced a rupture from his everyday life He cannot stop daydreaming of suicide, envisioning himself returning to the earth in what soon become terrifying blackout episodes His live in girlfriend, Sayuko, is in a similarlyFuminori Nakamura s Akutagawa Prize winner plunges us into the depths of a young man s winding, troubled psyche.An unnamed taxi driver in Tokyo has experienced a rupture from his everyday life He cannot stop daydreaming of suicide, envisioning himself returning to the earth in what soon become terrifying blackout episodes His live in girlfriend, Sayuko, is in a similarly bad phase, surrendering to alcoholism to escape the memory of her miscarriage He meets with the director of the orphanage where he once lived, and must confront awful memories of his past and an abusive family before determining what to do next.

    • ✓ The Boy in the Earth || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Fuminori Nakamura Allison Markin Powell
      363 Fuminori Nakamura Allison Markin Powell
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Boy in the Earth || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ Fuminori Nakamura Allison Markin Powell
      Posted by:Fuminori Nakamura Allison Markin Powell
      Published :2018-012-07T04:01:02+00:00

    One thought on “The Boy in the Earth”

    1. Wow. No question five star read. Super super dark noir tale. I have no words. Well, I actually have a lot of words but the review hasn't been published yet so just wanted to give it a quick signal boost in the meantime. Brilliant author, brilliant book. Read it!

    2. While I have a higher tolerance than most so-called for “dark” books that are unsettling and even disturbing, I am not a huge fan of noir fiction – characterized by cynicism and fatalism. I suppose that’s because noir fiction usually pre-supposes that the world is filled with justifiable heavy dread and ultimately, hopelessness and even nihilism.So I will readily say that I am not the most ideal reviewer for The Boy in the Earth. The book has been compared to Taxi Driver and for once, th [...]

    3. First posted at reallifereading/2017/05/2“All the books I have are depressing.”“So why do you read them?”“I don’t really know,” I said, laughing softly. “I feel like they save me. They get me thinking about things, even if it’s just that I’m not the only person who thinks it’s hard to get around in this world.”A young man who works as a taxi driver keeps putting himself in danger.Like throwing a cigarette butt at some drunk bikers.“I did what I did on purpose – with c [...]

    4. The Boy in the Earth was an interesting story. Dark, humorous, and depressing. I enjoyed the story line and the character development. I am so happy the book ended on a positive note of the theme looking forward to new beginning, instead of always dwelling on the past.

    5. Nakamura has become one of my favorite writers; he is lyrical but chooses his words carefully sparse with them so that they seem to pack more of punch, IMO.This book starts with the un-named main character getting the shit beat out of him by a motorcycle gang fact this man has become so obsessed with his own death that he begins to black out with dark fantasies. As the story progresses, he is forced to confront his traumatic past in order to move into the unknown future. I have read all of Nakam [...]

    6. Nakamura is intriguing as always in this book, but I didn’t get into it as much as the other two of his that I’ve read. It was interesting, but perhaps not as much of that strangeness. More malaise perhaps. It wasn’t bad though, just perhaps not quite as good as I’ve seen him be.

    7. A Tokyo taxi driver clumsily unpacks his childhood trauma.And by "clumsily" I mean "almost gets his damn self killed about ten times." Suicidal ideation and careless behavior are, of course, signs of profound trauma, and our narrator has it in spades. He doesn't even allow himself to remember the worst of what happened to him until 3/4 of the way through the book: up until then he blacks out whenever the truth gets to be too much to handle. When he's not in danger or unconscious, the narrator ph [...]

    8. 2.5 starsThis was one of the shortest books I've ever read by Mr. Nakamura.I usually enjoy the way he writes and his stories but I notice he doesn't add in the much of exposition or background so I'm usually left feeling lackluster about his characters.The Boy in the Earth is one of those books.The unnamed narrator, twenty seven and deeply depressed, drives a taxi aimlessly through the streets, contemplating his existence and his potential death by suicide. A very difficult childhood and abandon [...]

    9. As the author writes in an afterward, he prefers to specialize in stories that “dive deep into the nature of society and humanity, stories that press on and attempt to reveal our true nature.” And that is exactly what this book is about.Basically the tale is a monologue by a twenty-something taxi driver, with an occasional interloping comment by his alcoholic girlfriend, recounting his life, from the abandonment by his parents to his current status. His early years were unstable, shuttled am [...]

    10. "The Boy in the Earth was the fifth book I wrote. I have truly been saved by literature. If I hadn't met with stories that dive deep into the nature of society and humanity, stories that press on and attempt to reveal our true nature. I'm sure my life would have turned out differently. Literature is still precious to me. It provides me with the sustenance I need to go on living. Even now, having come to write books myself, that hasn't changed in the slightest. I want to thank everyone who helped [...]

    11. This was an interesting story of a young man who had difficult childhood, during which his parents leave him, faced physical abuse from distant relatives and eventually ends up in an orphanage.The character's name is unknown but he helps a friend named Sayuko, who works and drinks excessively. Both have ideas of suicide for their own reasons. Several events occur which lead them to want to change their lives. This book is worth reading!

    12. There's something about the nonchalant-ness of the narrators in Japanese literature that is very striking to me. It seems that, no matter the situation, they always manage to view it through a very unique (and yet simultaneously blase) manner. Nakamura's narrator is no different--despite the intense and sometimes very graphic depictions of death and near-death, they seem almost bored with it. It makes for a fascinating novel, while being nice and short as well.

    13. A quick read to spare the time. This book encapsulates the anxiety and fear associated with physical abuse and demonstrates how large of a hole abuse can rip through a person's soul. I experienced numerous personal flash backs when reading this book and reflected on who I was in the past to who I am now.

    14. The hero is a weird character but the story is comprehensible and engaging. I loved the book for expanding my horizons of what is possible in fiction without being contrived, confusing, or frustrating. I did not have to indulge an author's lame pretensions to be innovative in order to enjoy this book. Nakamura brought it off.

    15. A powerful character study of a Japanese taxi driver who grew up experiencing violence, and not experiencing love. Well-written.quick read, but not an enjoyable one.

    16. It is a paradoxical novel showing the desire to die yet live, the fragility and resilience of humans, as well as the cruelty and kindness humans are capable of inflicting on one another.

    17. I plucked this slim volume from my TBR randomly and was instantly reminded of the acutely penetrating tone of The Gun not immediately realizing that they were written by the same author. Nakamura truly has a singular voice. The Boy in the Earth also tackles themes of isolation and a compulsion towards self-destruction, but the protagonist is also the survivor of a dark past of neglect and abuse begging the question of the degree to which one can overcome the past.

    18. A dark, macabre, fascinating tale. As I read, I kept imagining this as the perfect screenplay to a film noir.

    19. For such a tiny, tiny book, The Boy in the Earth takes a long time to develop, but when it does.Our narrator is a taxi-driver in Tokyo, a job he fell into because he likes the solitude and lack of intimacy. He's depressed and his suicidal thoughts are getting worse and he has dreams of being swallowed up by the earth. His live-in girlfriend is similarly burdened with depression and alcohol dependency. Its clear that there's something more going on here than quarter-life ennui, but Nakamura holds [...]

    20. this is another translation. I keep trying to like them. I know that depression is very prevalent in Japan, especially among young adults. For most of the novel I figured that was all there was.Then at the end we get more background on the main character, what happened in his childhood beyond the abuse he was dealing with. Things that were buried deep in his memories because they were too terrible to deal with as a child.When he began to come to terms with his awful history I began to have empat [...]

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