And the Robot Went . . .

And the Robot Went Starting with a box of parts the Nosy Fox the Bear in a Blazer the Blue Gnu and other remarkable builders assemble the Robot step by step Each stage of the process has its own sound effect and t

  • Title: And the Robot Went . . .
  • Author: Michelle Robinson Sergio Ruzzier
  • ISBN: 9780544586529
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Starting with a box of parts, the Nosy Fox, the Bear in a Blazer, the Blue Gnu, and other remarkable builders assemble the Robot, step by step Each stage of the process has its own sound effect, and the growing list of sounds is repeated in every spread Young children will happily Click, Clang, and Tappa Tappa along and relish the surprise ending of this winsome cumulatiStarting with a box of parts, the Nosy Fox, the Bear in a Blazer, the Blue Gnu, and other remarkable builders assemble the Robot, step by step Each stage of the process has its own sound effect, and the growing list of sounds is repeated in every spread Young children will happily Click, Clang, and Tappa Tappa along and relish the surprise ending of this winsome cumulative tale.

    • [PDF] ë Free Read ☆ And the Robot Went . . . : by Michelle Robinson Sergio Ruzzier ↠
      480 Michelle Robinson Sergio Ruzzier
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ë Free Read ☆ And the Robot Went . . . : by Michelle Robinson Sergio Ruzzier ↠
      Posted by:Michelle Robinson Sergio Ruzzier
      Published :2018-08-10T12:00:01+00:00

    One thought on “And the Robot Went . . .”

    1. A cumulative story (a la "I know an old who") about a variety of animals and people who find a robot and do various things to it. The illustrations are softly colored and can get a little busy. But they're especially clever when it comes to the cameo of each character as the story gets longer. "The Nosy Fox looked in the box, the Eager Beaver pulled the lever, the Wicked Witch flicked the switch" etc. etc. On each page the character is shown in a different angle/pose, so the images stay fresh. T [...]

    2. 3.5 starsPen & ink and watercolor illustrations with neat spot illustrations and vignettes make this entertaining read ideal for reading aloud. The repetition, use of of rhymes and consistent rhythm also make this book a great tool for beginning readers.

    3. Cumulative story with rhyme and funny animals who build a robot. Keep in mind The author is a British so be sure to rhyme "lever" with "beaver".

    4. First of all, I have to say that I love Sergio Ruzzier's illustrations and this book certainly does not disappoint. The story is about a box of robot parts. Different critters try to make things work but are not successful until a young girl comes along with the key. The story is cumulative so all of the lovely sounds and motions are repeated as different parts of the robot are added. The author states that she wanted to write a book that would be fun for both parents and children to share and I [...]

    5. The true sign of success: Berry wanted me to read this one over and over and over. At one point I picked up another book and she removed it from my hands and shoved this one back in them. Ha!Everyone tries to help the robot put itself back together, but they’re missing a key component (See what I did there?). The format is a rhyme that builds on itself in a really cool way. This would be a fun way to introduce memorization of verse.

    6. Various characters work on a robot in this cumulative picture book which could easily lend itself to audience participation by giving a motion to each line. For example, "the Noisy Fox looked in the box" could be a motion of looking or opening hands, the "Eager Beaver pulled the lever" could be a bent arm extended down, etc. It would be fun to finish with everyone doing the robot!

    7. Each animal character does something to the robot which responds with a clang or a bang or a zippity sound. But none of the actions work, until the child comes along and takes control. Soon the robot is working like it should. Like The House That Jack Built, this story builds and repeats every action that came before.

    8. This was a book recommended to me by our music teacher, who loved the combination of robotics and sound. I loved it for the onomatopoeia, the rhyme, and the repetition similar to "The House that Jack Built". I also enjoyed how each movement, or action, had a robot reaction, which is good for teaching cause and effect, among other science concepts. Grade level-wiseI would say preK-2.

    9. "The Nosy Fox looked in the box, and the Robot went"After Nosy Fox opens the box all the other animals try and help put the Robot together but Robot doesn't seem to be working. Until "me" comes along with just thing to help Robot work. This is a fun book with cumulative text and adorable illustrations.

    10. When a box arrives at the farm and when opened it was full of parts. A group of characters including a nosy fox and a witch pull out parts and put them together and create a robot. This is not the end of the story as a child finds a key and uses it to animate the robot. Great sequence story for storytelling time filled with rich detail and quirky characters.

    11. This one is a lot of fun for classrooms to read together. The robot makes lots of sounds, each one different based on the action done to it, and it encourages participation through the onomatopoeia in the story. I wanted the end to be a little more robust, but it was an enjoyable read nonetheless.

    12. This book reminds me of "Drummer Hoff Fired It Off," which is one of my favorite childrens' books. A box arrives with parts inside, and it takes a Nosy Fox, an Eager Beaver, and other characters to figure out how to assemble it.

    13. I wasn't sure what I thought of this book when I read it. But after I set it down and went to do other things, I found at the repetitive phrases had stuck with me. This book is cute and just the right kind of silly, plus it's got a robot!

    14. An excellent cumulative story with a surprising ending. Features a bear in a blazer who fires a laser.

    15. Clear Ruzzier illustrations, which give the book a welcoming feeling. Somehow the robot is getting built, but the book doesn't explain that part, so that's kind of confusing.

    16. I look forward to sharing this with students to see their reaction - probably a small group as the illustrations are small for large group sharing (but they are still entertaining!).

    17. a bit of a non sensical story. clever rhymes and acceptable illustrations. might work for a read aloud book, but there are much better choices available.

    18. September 2017 - one of Ben's recent favorites. He started memorizing it right away, and the rhymes definitely help with that. Last night he finished each phrase for me. Reading on repeat.

    19. Beaver rhymes with lever? The rhymes were a little mouthy. I kept tripping over the words as I read aloud. Not my favorite read aloud.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *