One True God: Historical Consequences of Monotheism

One True God Historical Consequences of Monotheism Western history would be unrecognizable had it not been for people who believed in One True God There would have been wars but no religious wars There would have been moral codes but no Commandments

  • Title: One True God: Historical Consequences of Monotheism
  • Author: Rodney Stark
  • ISBN: 9780691115009
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Paperback
  • Western history would be unrecognizable had it not been for people who believed in One True God There would have been wars, but no religious wars There would have been moral codes, but no Commandments Had the Jews been polytheists, they would today be only another barely remembered people, less important, but just as extinct as the Babylonians Had Christians presentedWestern history would be unrecognizable had it not been for people who believed in One True God There would have been wars, but no religious wars There would have been moral codes, but no Commandments Had the Jews been polytheists, they would today be only another barely remembered people, less important, but just as extinct as the Babylonians Had Christians presented Jesus to the Greco Roman world as another God, their faith would long since have gone the way of Mithraism And surely Islam would never have made it out of the desert had Muhammad not removed Allah from the context of Arab paganism and proclaimed him as the only God.The three great monotheisms changed everything With his customary clarity and vigor, Rodney Stark explains how and why monotheism has such immense power both to unite and to divide Why and how did Jews, Christians, and Muslims missionize, and when and why did their efforts falter Why did both Christianity and Islam suddenly become less tolerant of Jews late in the eleventh century, prompting outbursts of mass murder Why were the Jewish massacres by Christians concentrated in the cities along the Rhine River, and why did the pogroms by Muslims take place mainly in Granada How could the Jews persist so long as a minority faith, able to withstand intense pressures to convert Why did they sometimes assimilate In the final chapter, Stark also examines the American experience to show that it is possible for committed monotheists to sustain norms of civility toward one another.A sweeping social history of religion, One True God shows how the great monotheisms shaped the past and created the modern world.

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      434 Rodney Stark
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      Posted by:Rodney Stark
      Published :2018-06-27T09:10:10+00:00

    One thought on “One True God: Historical Consequences of Monotheism”

    1. Horrible, like much of StarkIt's both ignorant and willful.Two comments of his, one about Hinduism and one about Buddhism's fate in India, will illustrate these two points.Calling Hinduism monotheistic is pure bullheaded willfulness, shoehorning to fit a preconceived theory. THe further south/nonAryan one goes in India, the dichotomy between the normally feminine household/village deities and the "received Hindu hierarchy" alone shows just how wrong this is.The idea that Buddhism died out in Ind [...]

    2. Interesting here and there, and firmly rooted in classic sociology (I'm pretty sure he quotes Weber and Durkheim more than anything else, and takes their views on non-Christian religions as holy writ, which seems slightly silly. Though them guys were purty smart, they didn't exactly have the tools of modern anthropology, for instance, at their disposal, and were unsurprisingly Eurocentric and limited to mostly secondhand accounts of other relgions). In addition, Stark occasionally says incredibl [...]

    3. This was a fascinating book. Stark wasn't a Christian when this was written--hence it is a materialist's perspective on religion--specifically the monotheistic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Some of the most interesting things I learned was that Judaism was once a missionary-minded religion. He also argues that Christianity never deeply penetrated Europe--its mission was abbreviated and hence was mostly superficial. That's not to say that it didn't deeply penetrate some, or even man [...]

    4. This book is a bit outdated but it still has some things to offer. It begins strong but it relies on an economic / cost-benefit approach to religion (rational choice theory). By chapter 3 it diverges from its main thesis and, while I don't think Stark intended it, has a tendency to minimize persecution of Jewish people by Christians during the late medieval era. It ends with an interesting take on the formation of American "Civic Religion" while illuminating aspects of Adam Smith's take on the R [...]

    5. Overall, the book makes interesting correlations and provided a solid overview of monotheism that I hadn't known before. Stark, unlike some historians, wrote this in a really easy-to-understand way without ego. The writing was a little dry, but I think Stark accomplished what he intended to do.

    6. Enlightening. Chapters 4 and 5 are absolute must-reads, though the earlier chapters contained good info too. Chapter 4 has fascinating implications for Mormonism.

    7. As always, Stark produces a difficult, possibly contradictory array of points on the subjects of belief, faith and

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