Tastes Like Chicken: A History of America's Favorite Bird

Tastes Like Chicken A History of America s Favorite Bird How did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today It s hard to imagine but there was a point in history not terribly long ago that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds o

  • Title: Tastes Like Chicken: A History of America's Favorite Bird
  • Author: Emelyn Rude
  • ISBN: 9781681771632
  • Page: 184
  • Format: Hardcover
  • How did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today It s hard to imagine, but there was a point in history, not terribly long ago, that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds of chicken per year Today, those numbers are strikingly different we consumer nearly twenty five times as much chicken as our great grandparents did.Collectively, AmericansHow did chicken achieve the culinary ubiquity it enjoys today It s hard to imagine, but there was a point in history, not terribly long ago, that individual people each consumed less than ten pounds of chicken per year Today, those numbers are strikingly different we consumer nearly twenty five times as much chicken as our great grandparents did.Collectively, Americans devour 73.1 million pounds of chicken in a day, close to 8.6 billion birds per year How did chicken rise from near invisibility to being in seemingly every pot, as per Herbert Hoover s famous promise Emelyn Rude explores this fascinating phenomenon in Tastes Like Chicken With meticulous research, Rude details the ascendancy of chicken from its humble origins to its centrality on grocery store shelves and in restaurants and kitchens Along the way, she reveals startling key points in its history, such as the moment it was first stuffed and roasted by the Romans, how the ancients obsession with cockfighting helped the animal reach Western Europe, and how slavery contributed to the ubiquity of fried chicken today.In the spirit of Mark Kurlansky s Cod and Bee Wilson s Consider the Fork, Tastes Like Chicken is a fascinating, clever, and surprising discourse on one of America s favorite foods.

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      Published :2018-06-15T05:34:15+00:00

    One thought on “Tastes Like Chicken: A History of America's Favorite Bird”

    1. Imagine a world where chickens are way more valuable alive than dead, producing eggs, eating bugs and spreading around manure from the composting pile (yielding the phrases yard bird and shitbird, by the way), and where fried chicken is just for special occasions because the meat yield is so low, the work so high and the sacrifice of a chicken only justified by extras or worn out hens. Until the 1940s, this was the culinary place of chicken--a meat so expensive people used veal to make mock chic [...]

    2. I really enjoyed this book, but as always, I wonder why I even eat chicken when I get to the chapters on how they are raised. It brought up visions of Food, Inc.Lots of good stuff in here (if you're inclined to consider odd facts about animals good stuff). There is so much trivia in this book. I learned why chicken wasn't a popular meat until recently (Hey! It's not real food for real men!) and I learned about the modern development of the chicken industry. I actually had a hard time putting thi [...]

    3. GNAB I received a free electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley, Emelyn Rude, and Pegasus Books. Thank you all for sharing this extraordinary history with me. Chickens are again very popular in American kitchens - and backyards. The last few years we have seen a massive return to the days of a coop in the back yard to provide GMO-free, pesticide-free, antibiotic-free eggs and chicken to American tables. Of course, few of us will actually kill and pluck and dra [...]

    4. The chicken, despite its often modest appearance, is a bird of great and surprising history. Originally only fed to those who were considered sick or of weak constitution, the massive broiler bird that makes it to America's supermarkets each week is not the bird of the 1800s. Emelyn Rude, a somewhat accidental vegan, makes an interesting narrator for Tastes Like Chicken, which at times stumbles along like the fat birds it documents.The chicken has been at the heart of many truly fascinating poin [...]

    5. I found this book very interesting. It traces the culinary history of chicken and eggs, and one of the things I liked was that it included original recipes for the dishes discussed (a few had to be translated).Our appetite for chickens and their eggs is so voracious that the worldwide population of chickens is over 50 billion, making Gallus gallus domesticus one of the most abundant avian species in the world. Almost everyone seems to enjoy it in some form – Hungarians braise it to make paprik [...]

    6. Review originally posted at Book of BoganI don't really know what brought me to pick up this book, other than the fact that chicken is probably my favourite type of meat, and I guess I had - somewhat naively I guess - always assumed that the path of chicken from domestication to our dinner plates has been a straightforward affair.Tastes like Chicken focuses on the last few centuries worth of history of the raising, and ultimately the industrialisation of the production of chicken meat, and other [...]

    7. Culinary history is not my usual pick, but if this book is any indication of the genre, I'll be changing that. Emelyn Rude's meticulously researched history of the chicken as a domesticated source of protein across centuries and continents is packaged neatly in delightful, engaging prose. With every chapter, I learned something new and fascinating about American history that was shockingly connected with the seemingly innocuous bird. If you're at all interested in the history of America and the [...]

    8. Like most histories on obscure subjects, what starts out as a fun sidedish becomes a multi-course meal that leaves you a bit bloated But it's well told for the most part and the recipes are a nice touch I appreciate what the little does for me on a weekly basis

    9. I enjoyed the history of our fair bird but not so much the discussion of modern chicken raising practices. I do wish the author had stuck with chronology order, though, as she skipped around quite a bit until about post WWII times.

    10. Just could not get into this book. It seems like a bunch of fact dumping. Chapter breaks seem disorganized and the recipes scattered throughout just interrupt the flow.

    11. I assumed this would be another book about the industrial chicken industry and all its evils. But, Emelyn Rude takes a different look at the chicken. She looks at chicken as a food source and how much that has changed over the years. Chicken was seen as food only for sick or ailing people in the 1800's, while beef was for "strength" or healthy people. Then during slavery in the American South, chickens weren't considered "livestock" so slaves could own them and then chicken became associated wit [...]

    12. An interesting look at chicken Despite the title and the subject, chicken is a rather versatile food. Chicken nuggets, fried chicken, General Tso's chicken, etc. This book purports to look at this food that is a major meat (maybe the main one for some people) and how it fits in our lives, our history, our cultural context, etc. Author Rude looks at the history of the chicken, from how it got to the United States, how the animal was farmed, the role it has played in history, how people prepare c [...]

    13. Many of us eat chicken regularly but what do we know about our favorite source of feathered protein? If pressed to name a chicken breed, many of us might be able to come up with something like Rhode Island Red, but we don't really know what that means. Historian Emelyn Rude, who has a background in the restaurant biz, fills us in on the relationship between gallus gallus domesticus and our dinner plate. Did you know that Queen Victoria started the trend of keeping pet hens? Did you know that Put [...]

    14. This was interesting. It's about the history of chicken. Some of it I already knew. Some of it I didn't. It could have used a mention of the role of pet food in the modern supply chain of chicken.

    15. An entertaining and informative look at how chicken has been prepared throughout history. Includes recipes.

    16. This book is written in an engaging and humorous style. There are period recipes throughout. I'm going to leave it at my family's farm in the Adirondacks where my cousin keeps chickens.

    17. A fantastic cultural, industrial, and light scientific history of chicken farming and chicken eating. There are dozens of stories - the Hen Craze of Victorian England, the Kosher Chicken War of 1920s New York, Colonel Sanders and General Tso - that could each carry their own books (as well as other, heavier topics like the ethics of factory farming and the horrific punishments of African American chicken thieves), but Rude's goal is to tell a lot of stories quickly, and she provides a generous s [...]

    18. This book was interesting but I am not one for history books. I was anticipating more history and information about the Delmarva area. It definitely had good history about the chicken. I don't love history so I skimmed most of the beginning chapters and at the end just read about the Delmarva area when I saw it was included in some chapters. At some other point I do want to read this book more thoroughly.

    19. This is an informative account of the rise of chicken farming in the US. It doesn't touch much on current scary issues (i.e. hormones, unethical treatment of animals), which interest me, someone who wishes to know exactly what is being consumed. But I'm glad I read it. (Won an ARC in a giveaway)

    20. Who knew there was so much history to the lowly chicken. Great overview of how and why the chicken became the go to protein in America. Detailed but interesting read. The addition of historical recipes was a nice add on.

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