Fruitlands: Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect

Fruitlands Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect We are all going to be made perfect In with all their possessions loaded onto a single wagon ten year old Louisa May Alcott and her family bravely set out into the wilderness to make a new home

  • Title: Fruitlands: Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect
  • Author: Gloria Whelan
  • ISBN: 9780064410847
  • Page: 389
  • Format: Paperback
  • We are all going to be made perfect In 1843, with all their possessions loaded onto a single wagon, ten year old Louisa May Alcott and her family bravely set out into the wilderness to make a new home for themselves on a farm called Fruitlands Louisa s father has a dream of living a perfect, simple life It won t be easy, but the family has vowed to uphold his highWe are all going to be made perfect In 1843, with all their possessions loaded onto a single wagon, ten year old Louisa May Alcott and her family bravely set out into the wilderness to make a new home for themselves on a farm called Fruitlands Louisa s father has a dream of living a perfect, simple life It won t be easy, but the family has vowed to uphold his high ideals.In her diary one she shares with her parents Louisa records her efforts to become the girl her parents would like her to be But in another, secret diary, she reveals the hardships of this new life, and pours out her real hopes and worries Can Louisa live up to her father s expectations Or will trying to be perfect tear the family apart

    • ☆ Fruitlands: Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect || ¹ PDF Download by ☆ Gloria Whelan
      389 Gloria Whelan
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Fruitlands: Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect || ¹ PDF Download by ☆ Gloria Whelan
      Posted by:Gloria Whelan
      Published :2018-06-22T17:18:54+00:00

    One thought on “Fruitlands: Louisa May Alcott Made Perfect”

    1. An unusual historical fiction by Gloria Whelan based on the journals of Louisa May Alcott when her family lived in the Utopian commune in Western Massachusetts. They were among the first vegan back in their day.

    2. This was a sweet and eye opening book. Fruitlands is a great illustration of families during this historical period and the hopes for stability and progression they had. This would be a great book to read when learning about different historical times of expansion and an inner look into what the lives of the children during these times looked like. This book followed :ours May Alcott as she strived to live up to what her parents desired for her life to be. Through moving away to create a better [...]

    3. I plan to teach this book in the fall for my "special topics in American Lit: YA dystopian fiction" class in the fall. I think we will likely start out with this one, which is a fictional representation of Louisa May Alcott's family and their attempt to start a real life utopia called Fruitlands. Friends of Emerson and Thoreau, Louisa's father and Mr. Lane spend all their money to establish a perfect, vegetarian, utopian community dedicated to self-improvement, God and Enlightenment ideals. Desp [...]

    4. I was given this book by my dear friend a few years ago and it has sat idle on my to read shelf. Since, in the last year, I have been on a Louisa May Alcott kick, I thought I would finally read this one.Fruitlands, by Gloria Whelan, is an historical based fiction designed for younger readers in the 8-12 range. It features the Alcott family's brief stint living off the land and in the company of like minded individuals. Translation: vegan, hippie commune. Well not hippies, more like the hippies o [...]

    5. A fictional diary account of the Alcott family's vision to start a community where people live in peace with each other and nature, living off the land. Louisa keeps two diaries, one for her parents' eyes and a secret one where she reveals what's really happening between the lines of her first diary. In many ways, her father and Mr. Lane, the financial backer of Fruitlands, are ridiculously idealistic. The community should only eat plants that grow up to the sky rather than those that grow down [...]

    6. In the spirit of Transcendental Wild Oats, this is an account of the Alcott family's attempt to build a utopian community at Fruitlands, as told through Louisa’s fictional diary entries. The Alcott girls all kept diaries which their parents read. That’s a problem for Louisa, though: “Mother says our diaries ought to be a record of pure thoughts and good actions. She and Father often peek into our diaries to see that it is so. Yet Father tells us that we must be honest in our thoughts. I do [...]

    7. Although this book is published as recommended for 8-11 year olds, I wouldn't want my 8 year old to read it. If someone walked into a library and picked this up, reading it out of the context of the lives of the Alcott Family, I'm afraid it would be depressing with no hope or mention of the good things that came from this family.  Bronson Alcott just sounds mentally ill and abusive of his family.  It might be ok reading for a completist familiar with the whole story of the Alcotts and the Tran [...]

    8. Based on actual events in the childhood of Louisa May Alcott. Her family moved to Fruitlands and tried a Thoreau-isque existance, living only on what they could be replenished from the land, mostly grain, vegetables and fruits. The book contains 2 fictional diaries that Louisa kept- one required by her father (the nice version of her thoughts) and the second, in italics, of her actual feelings. I thought this was an interesting peek into the Alcott family, and the personality of one of my favori [...]

    9. This book made sense of my lifelong fascination with Louisa May Alcott, who strove to perfect herself for the approval of a distant and stern father, who struggled with his ideas of a utopian lifestlyle. Intended for young adults, it explains the Fruitlands experiment and Alcott's life clearly and in brief. Excellent pre-reading for Susan Cheever's American Bloomsbury.

    10. A great read about Louisa May Alcott's early life as a Quaker! Her, her family, strict Mr. Lane , his son William and some other men live on some farmland they call "Fruitland". They are strict Vegans always trying to better themselves! I highly recommend it for any age.

    11. This book was really amazing I loved it because it was basiclly part of my childhood. It also surprised it was like a perfect book for me.

    12. This book was a riot! I got it when my Mom & I visited Fruitlands this fall. It's for older kids and captures some of the insanity of the fruitlands project in a fun way.

    13. A cute, quick read. Can't wait to visit Fruitlands, and this book will help me (and my daughters) understand more about what LMA went through during her time there.

    14. A very quick read based on the journals of young Louisa May Alcott. I really enjoyed reading about the roots of vegan living ; )

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