"Double Canister at Ten Yards": The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863

Double Canister at Ten Yards The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett s Charge July Gettysburg is one of the most famous and studied battles of history and Pickett s Charge its climax on the third day continues to fascinate a new generation of readers Most accounts of the grand as

  • Title: "Double Canister at Ten Yards": The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863
  • Author: David Shultz
  • ISBN: 9781611212723
  • Page: 491
  • Format: Paperback
  • Gettysburg is one of the most famous and studied battles of history, and Pickett s Charge, its climax on the third day, continues to fascinate a new generation of readers Most accounts of the grand assault focus on General Robert E Lee s reasons for making the charge, its preparation, organization, and ultimate failure Author David Shultz, however, in Double Canister aGettysburg is one of the most famous and studied battles of history, and Pickett s Charge, its climax on the third day, continues to fascinate a new generation of readers Most accounts of the grand assault focus on General Robert E Lee s reasons for making the charge, its preparation, organization, and ultimate failure Author David Shultz, however, in Double Canister at Ten Yards The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett s Charge, July 3, 1863, focuses his examination on how and why the Union long arm beat back the Confederate foot soldiers.After two days of heavy fighting on July 1 and 2, 1863, the commander of the Army of the Potomac, Maj General George G Meade, correctly surmised General Lee would remain on the offensive on July 3 and strike the Union center on Cemetery Ridge Meade informed Maj Gen Winfield Hancock, whose infantry lined the ridge, that his sector would bear the brunt on the morrow and to prepare accordingly Meade also warned to his capable chief of artillery, Brig Gen Henry J Hunt, and tasked him with preparing his guns to deal with the approaching assault.Shultz, who has studied Gettysburg for decades and walked every yard of its hallowed ground, uses official reports, letters, diaries, and other accounts to meticulously explain how Hunt and his officers and men worked tirelessly that night and well into July 3 to organize a lethal package of orchestrated destruction to greet Lee s vaunted infantry in an effort that would be hailed by many historians as The High Water Mark of the Confederacy The war witnessed many large scale assaults and artillery bombardments, but no example of defensive gunnery was destructive than the ring of direct frontal and full flank enfilading fire Hunt s batteries unleashed upon Lee s assaulting columns The iron rain broke and drove back the massed attack within a short time, leaving a fraction of the attacking force to cross the Emmitsburg Road to scale the deadly Ridge Double Canister at Ten Yards will change the way you look at Pickett s Charge, and leave you wondering yet again why an officer as experienced and gifted as General Lee ordered it in the first place.

    • [PDF] ✓ Free Download ↠ "Double Canister at Ten Yards": The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863 : by David Shultz Ù
      491 David Shultz
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Download ↠ "Double Canister at Ten Yards": The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863 : by David Shultz Ù
      Posted by:David Shultz
      Published :2018-06-14T16:47:42+00:00

    One thought on “"Double Canister at Ten Yards": The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863”

    1. This is a narrowly focused volume--the role of Union artillery on the 3rd day at Gettysburg. The book explores the role of a number of artillery officers--with the chief of artillery, General Henry Hunt, covered most heavily. And with good reason. He was a whirling dervish, moving across the battlefield before "Pickett's Charge" as well as during it. He spent much time positioning artillery units on July 2nd as well as July 3rd. The "long arm" was well placed on the 3rd.The Confederate advance o [...]

    2. One of the things I love about being a Civil War book reviewer is the new found information on battles which seem to have been covered ten times over. “Double Canister at Ten Yards” may seem like just another Gettysburg book, but here it is handled differently. David L. Shultz has taken the stance of the Union perspective during Pickett’s Charge, but not only that, he details the Federal Artillery instead of just the infantry. This outlook into the artillery has been one of the more fascin [...]

    3. How Less Can Be More In Studying Pickett's ChargeSo much has been written about Pickett's Charge on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg that it is difficult to say something fresh. David Shultz accomplishes this feat in his new book, "Double Canister at Ten Yards: The Federal Artillery and the Repulse of Pickett's Charge, July 3, 1863." The author of many articles and books about Gettysburg, Shultz specializes in the study of artillery.Less can be more. Shultz's book is short and focuses e [...]

    4. While I'm not normally one who enjoys the detailed movement accounts of men and materiel, Mr. Shutlz's account of the role of the Union artillery on the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg is well done. Maps were the key to helping me track the myriad battery level units who took part in the battle.c but I could track the units he referenced and their role in evolving battle. Moreover, Double Canister offers an excellent account of the effectiveness of concentrated artillery fire. I became inc [...]

    5. A quick read which covers the artillery repulse of Pickett's charge almost exclusively from the Union artillery perspective (especially concentrating on the individual units engaged) with an emphasis on its effectiveness due largely to organizational excellence of its commander, Gen. Henry Hunt. Supplemented with many maps and some photos (both period and modern) the text flows well and expresses the chaos and horrible carnage of the event. The text needs some editing. Athough not detracting fro [...]

    6. Very detailed on positioning of Federal Artillery throughout Pickett’s charge. Well documented. My one suggestion is that more maps would be helpful, especially close-ups of portions of artillery placement on sections of Cemetery Ridge. Most maps covered the whole of the ridge and thus were lacing in the detail provided in the narrative. For a student of Gettysburg, this is a good resource.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *