Promised You a Miracle: UK80-82

Promised You a Miracle UK The early s in Britain were a time of hope and of dread of Cold War tension and imminent conflict when crowds in the street could mean an ecstatic national celebration or an inner city riot Here

  • Title: Promised You a Miracle: UK80-82
  • Author: Andy Beckett
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The early 1980s in Britain were a time of hope, and of dread of Cold War tension and imminent conflict, when crowds in the street could mean an ecstatic national celebration or an inner city riot Here, Andy Beckett recreates an often misunderstood moment of transition, with all its potential and uncertainty the first precarious years of Margaret Thatcher s government BThe early 1980s in Britain were a time of hope, and of dread of Cold War tension and imminent conflict, when crowds in the street could mean an ecstatic national celebration or an inner city riot Here, Andy Beckett recreates an often misunderstood moment of transition, with all its potential and uncertainty the first precarious years of Margaret Thatcher s government By the end of 1982, the country was changing, leaving the kinder, sluggish postwar Britain decisively behind, and becoming the country we have lived in ever since assertive, commercially driven, outward looking, often harsher than its neighbours.

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      Published :2018-06-14T20:43:05+00:00

    One thought on “Promised You a Miracle: UK80-82”

    1. Andy Beckett is a historian with journalistic training - a combination that makes him particularly well suited for writing contemporary history, where the wealth of material is so vast that selecting precisely the right story and telling it well is a crucial skill. Beckett does select the right stories - the best chapters here (and at its best, Promised You A Miracle is superb) take one or two eyewitnesses to early 80s history and let them speak. He interviews the great and not always good too - [...]

    2. Having written a widely acclaimed one volume history of the 1970s Beckett turns his attention to the 1980s. Perhaps Beckett or his publishers have their eye on a multi volume approach since Beckett only covers the first two years of the 1980s. Thatchers victory in 1979 kick started the 80s a year early "a portentous moment, for those who pay attention to portents" as Margaret Drabble says at the beginning of her state of the nation 1980s novel The Radiant Way. Beckett doesn't quote this but Domi [...]

    3. Many western democracies look to the 1980s as a pivot point in their history. Terms like revolution are tossed about in describing the disruptive and tumultuous social, political and economic transformations of this era. Such visible change draws historians like moths to a flame. In the UK, the period covered by this book (1980-1982) certainly sowed the seeds of significant transformations in Britain. Andy Beckett has little need to look too far beyond this timeframe, although he does follow som [...]

    4. Andy Beckett wrote an excellent book. A thorough but very readable review of the early Thatcher years in Britain. If you want to know more about the last gasp of British auto manufacturing, the jingoistic Falklands war, what led to the Toxteth riots in Liverpool, the Greenham Common women and the anti-nuclear protests and what it was to live on America's "unsinkable aircraft carrier" aka the British Isles, the fighting and sometimes silly and self-destructive (but heartfelt) squabbles on the Lef [...]

    5. It makes me feel old at the thought that for some time now the 80s have been studied as history. Hot on the heels of watching Dominic Sandbrook's TV documentary series I've read this book, which looks at the years 1980-82. Even though it's a short period Beckett covers a lot. Just a sample of the things covered are: the Austin Metro, the creation of the SDP, the '81 riots (Toxteth rather than Brixton this time), Ken Livingston & the GLC, Greenham Common, the Docklands regeneration and the Fa [...]

    6. A very absorbing study of a pivotal period both in modern British history and my own life. Full of interesting snippets and telling anecdotes with which Beckett adroitly recreates a vanished time and place. Nostalgic without being maudlin, by detailing the genesis of ideas and trends which are now firmly embedded in society Beckett reminds us of LP Hartley's famous dictum that "The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there". A really excellent read.

    7. Decent book about the early 80s. I like the way the author concentrated on some specifics rather than a scatter gun approach. The chapter on how the Docklands grew was very interesting and Andy Beckett had clearly done some quality research speaking to people who were involved at the time.

    8. The years of 1980 to 1982, when Britain under Margaret Thatcher become a laboratory for radical free market ideas and economic shock treatment, are key to understanding the Britain of today. That is the contention of “Promised You A Miracle”, Andy Beckett’s analysis of the political, economic and cultural landscapes of Britain in the early years of Thatcherism.Despite the claims made by right-wingers over the last 30 years, “Promised You A Miracle” shows that the triumph of Thatcherism [...]

    9. I'm roughly the same age as Andy Beckett so his books have a real resonance for me, covering the years in which I grew up. I enjoyed his previous book When The Lights Went Out Britain In The Seventies which covered all of the stuff that was happening whilst I was watching 'Starsky & Hutch' and 'The Two Ronnies', and so I looked forward to reading this one. It didn't disappoint.Unlike many a dry history, Andy Beckett writes himself into the story and tells you a little bit about what was goin [...]

    10. If journalism is the first draft of history, then Andy Beckett's description of Britain in the early 1980s is history version 1.5. Using a range of memoirs, contemporary accounts and personal interviews with man of the key individuals from the era, he offers a idiosyncratic description of the period that is leavened with his own memories of his life in Britain during that time. HIs argument is a somewhat contrarian one: that these years were not just the beginnings of a lurch rightward as has of [...]

    11. This was an interesting and readable tour of Britain in the early 1980s covering topics such as the Falklands, rise of the SDP, Thatcherism and monetarism, the Metro car, the GLC, the Docklands, Channel 4 etcEach topic was explored through vignettes with contemporary interviews with the key people involved. The author was able to speak to many of the critical players and their insights, and the clear parallels with modern Britain were the strongest parts of the book.I enjoyed the first few chapt [...]

    12. an eclectic selection of aspects of the early 80s. The Falklands War features prominently, as is only to be expected: for the author, this is the sole reason Thatcher and thatcherism survived. There is a fair deal on economic thinking, although there is much less on detailed economic policy. There is not much on the Cold War, but a good deal on Greenham Common. There is nothing on football and hooliganism, but a wealth of detail about cricket. There is almost nothing on New Romanticism but a who [...]

    13. The early 1980s were to the UK what the late 1960s were to the USA, or the late 80s and early 90s were in Russia. A mix of economic upheaval, political conflict and social transformation combined to threaten to tear British society apart. Andy Beckett chronicles this time of turbulence brilliantly, visiting obvious subjects, such as the Falklands War, the Toxteth riots, and the Thatcher government, as well as less obvious areas, like the transformation of the London Docklands, the launch of Chan [...]

    14. Extremely well-researched and written, but despite (or because of) this, it comes across as a set of vignettes united by place and time, rather than the cohesive account of the birth of New Britain that it proposes. FWIW (and obviously, one acknowledges the author's hard work, research and judgement) one suspects that extending the narrative until, say 1987, would have given the narrative more convincing form - taking in the abolition of the GLC and its legacy, Death in Gibraltar and Thatcher's [...]

    15. How Britain changed in the late 70s and early 80s, and what remains of those changes.Part history; part journalism of the surviving key players.Seemingly fair-minded: the Tories are painted as neither entirely villainous nor entirely heroic; Labour as neither entirely competent nor entirely virtuous.It's an excellent look at some of the most momentous aspects of the early 80s, with not a few surprising details and authorial gems.It's also strangely discrete, however, with little if any flow from [...]

    16. Took me a while to plough through this, no reflection on the book which is interesting and very readable. Reading a history of a time I remember so well, with one major caveat, feels odd. Few surprises, no revelations, maybe I hadn't remembered what ABC were called before they were called ABC, but that's about it. (I've forgotten already, by the way) The caveat is that though this all seemed so very familiar I wasn't actually living in the UK at this time.

    17. history at its best; it provides the reader with one of the most exhaustive understanding of a time/place I've ever seen

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