Death by Video Game: Tales of obsession from the virtual frontline

Death by Video Game Tales of obsession from the virtual frontline In Canada volunteers are raising money for charity by playing marathon stints of Penn Teller s Desert Bus probably the worst video game ever created Across the globe thousands of viewers tune in to

  • Title: Death by Video Game: Tales of obsession from the virtual frontline
  • Author: Simon Parkin Toby Longworth
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Audible Audio
  • In Canada, volunteers are raising money for charity by playing marathon stints of Penn Teller s Desert Bus, probably the worst video game ever created.Across the globe, thousands of viewers tune in to Kurt J Mac s epic but seemingly pointless voyage towards the outer realms of Minecraft s procedurally generated world.In Iraq, mothers encourage their children to enteIn Canada, volunteers are raising money for charity by playing marathon stints of Penn Teller s Desert Bus, probably the worst video game ever created.Across the globe, thousands of viewers tune in to Kurt J Mac s epic but seemingly pointless voyage towards the outer realms of Minecraft s procedurally generated world.In Iraq, mothers encourage their children to enter Call of Duty competitions to keep them off the bomb ravaged streets of Baghdad.And in Taiwan, a spate of deaths at gaming caf s is raising questions about what playing video games does to us.In Death by Video Game, renowned gaming journalist Simon Parkin delves into the lives of obsessive gamers to answer the question why do we spend so many hours of our lives in virtual playgrounds Telling the stories of gamers and the developers who create the worlds they obsessively inhabit, Death by Video Game is a window on the human stories that have made video games the 21st century s most vibrant cultural medium 2015 Simon Parkin P 2015 Audible, Ltd

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    One thought on “Death by Video Game: Tales of obsession from the virtual frontline”

    1. La estructura del libro es sota caballo y rey. A lo largo de una docena de artículos bien compartimentados, Parkin analiza la atracción de los videojuegos desde diferentes facetas: cómo satisfacen nuestro deseo de explorar; su condición de refugio a la hora de sobrellevar las contrariedades de nuestra vida; su función como puerta de entrada a otras formas de ver el mundo y observar los problemas que nos rodean; su indudable valor como fuente de empatía hacia todo tipo de sentimientos Y par [...]

    2. Por aquello de que al mal trago hay que apurarlo, empecemos con lo peor: Simon Parkin no es la estrella más brillante del firmamento. El crítico y periodista especializado en videojuegos -quien publica regularmente en medio tan prestigiosos como The New Yorker, The Guardian o New Scientist- arma todo su planteo a partir de verdades de perogrullo u opiniones personales que busca hacer pasar como verdades indiscutibles, tratando siempre de que los datos que está presentando inclinen la balanza [...]

    3. Why do humans play video games? Viewed from a remove, they can seem like little more than merit-less time-wasters. This can be true even for those embedded in the culture, such as British journalist Simon Parkin, whose first book, 'Death by Video Game', explores this question at length and from a variety of engrossing angles.“In humanity’s ongoing project of survival and propagation, video games seemingly contribute little,” he notes in the introduction. Yet there are compelling depths to [...]

    4. This is a typically intelligent, considered look at what is the youngest and perhaps the most important new popular medium of our time. The approach is not impersonal, but primarily journalistic: rather than making an argument solely from experience, or launching a soapbox-style apologia for the subject, the author seeks instead to demonstrate and to explain the virtues of games by reference to all kinds of different examples from around the world. We start off in an internet cafe in Taiwan, whe [...]

    5. This book is written poorly.That out of the way, it also tries to be about too much. The sensational title is only partially and occasionally explored over the course of the book.It reads like a manuscript of a novice video game journalist. Instead of chapters, they feel more like blog posts.Additionally, most of the subjects covered within have been done by actual video game journalists and better. This is a collation of information the way a rushed homework assignment is the collation of a sem [...]

    6. Good:* A few thought provoking essays about gaming.Bad:* I find that many of the essays in the book are not interesting. This is probably because: I've played/heard of the game, I'm aware of the issues/controversies of the game/topic or the game being discussed is so obscure and irrelevant, it's not even worth playing or even knowing.* Inconsistencies/errors, for example: the book initially claims that team Dignitas currently has 70 players. A few pages later it claims that the team currently ha [...]

    7. It felt like there was a huge gap between the book I was promised and the book that I ended up reading. :-(

    8. The title of the book is misleading as this only features at the beginning of the book. The rest of the chapters are about game development, glitches, obsessions etc. - some are interesting, others not so. Wasn't really all that interesting to me - more miss than hit, as it wasn't what I expected it to be.

    9. The title, blurb, and fantastic opening few pages had me anticipating a delve into an underground of extreme video game experience, but the majority of this book is made up of fairly obvious musings on the meaning of video game consumption and that of experiencing art in general. Some essays grabbed me more than others, but I found this a surprising slog.

    10. Title is a little misleading: it's much less about death by video games and more about why games are engaging. Very interesting, informative read!

    11. No existe mejor medio para aquel dispuesto a cambiar las reglas del juego que aquel cuyo nacimiento sea más reciente. Cada vez que un medio llega al mundo, dado que le llevará años llegar a ser considerado arte —básicamente, tanto tiempo como tarde estar normalizado entre todas las generaciones vivas en ese momento—, siempre empieza con una mezcla de utilitarismo y juego para, en poco tiempo, no más de dos o tres décadas, convertirse en un negocio que espolea poco después la venta de [...]

    12. Essentially, Parkin's Death by Video Game is a book with a sensationalist title, the full meaning of which only becomes evident when you're a good way through the book. Yes, there is the obvious meaning, and Parkin does describe those documented cases where people died while playing games, either through some sort of unexpected catastrophic failure, or the slower decline of a person who does nothing but play videogames for five days straight. But the title can also be seen as a sort of authorshi [...]

    13. I already love Simon Parkin's Edge articles so knew I would love this too. Discusses a variety of games and well documented (sometimes fatal) incidents of video game obsession. Made me want to hunt for the GTA Sasquatch.

    14. Don't be put off by the title. This is not just about people dying after playing video games. In fact that's a minor, if important, part of the subject. What it is, is a fascinating account of the people who play and make video games, along with their motivations. It includes some of the history, going back to the very early days of computing in the 1960s and early game developers. Now I was a computer programmer in the late 1960s and I have difficulty imagining how anyone could have developed e [...]

    15. AKA The Game Criticism Primer: 2004-2015.For anyone who has kept up with games criticism for the past few years, much of what is covered in this book will be fairly old hat. If you read Critical Distance every week or keep your eyes on the homepages of Gamasutra, or check in with Simon Parkin's own work in The New Yorker, you have likely heard these stories and perspectives before.That being said, you'll have rarely heard them with such an even hand, or in such a succinct collection. As such, De [...]

    16. For me, a great read. Firstly, it just "zips along" - or it flows beautifully, in the way that all good non-fiction, non-textbook writing should do. It infuses great detailed individual stories and vignettes and then links them together to make wider points - but you're hooked nicely while it does that, which I love. Secondly, the book really gets to grips with video games (the whole edifice) as reflective of society and vice versa. The chapter structure is well laid out to do that, but it isn't [...]

    17. geen diepgaande uiteenzetting over de ethiek van games, maar gewoon een boek van een man met passie voor games. het boek relativeert de jubel en gruwel verhalen over games en laat zien dat het net als andere media iets is waar veel moois,maar ook lelijks in schuilt. het is meer geschreven als blog en gaat af en toe van de hak op de tak, maar als je daar aan gewend bent is het voor heerlijk om te lezen. de schrijver geeft veel interessante anekdotes, verwijst naar bekende games en put uit eigen e [...]

    18. I don't think I've read such a mis-titled book in quite a while. Although the book does open with a discussion on deaths attributable to video gaming, mainly in Internet cafes in the Far East (those bits were interesting, call me ghoulish but I can't imagine sitting down and playing a computer game for more than a few hours, so to do it so long, at lengths way over 24 hours is unbelievable and it's perhaps unsurprising that some people die), most of the book is a discussion about the benefits of [...]

    19. The title, and the tale of internet cafe death that bookends the book, is a touch misleading as the bulk of the book isn't about the detrimental effects of videogames on our health at all. Rather, its various accounts and tales delve into the reasons why we become absorbed in games, with much of it focusing on people who have used games to heal emotionally, to work through problems or as an outlet for expression. They're worlds we can retreat into, with rules we understand and problems we can de [...]

    20. The title is sensational; the subtitle is more accurate. This is a book about obsession and video games and what could drive a person to become so obsessed they kill themselves from playing too much. The beginning is not as strong as the latter sections of the book, but Parkin clearly finds his voice as the book goes on. Not only did I enjoy reading the discussion he provides in each chapter, I loved the new games I've never heard of that Parkin introduced me to. Above all, I appreciate the thou [...]

    21. Main main issue with this book is that it has a somewhat misleading title, possibly to raw in readers who otherwise may not be interested in the subject matter. The book isn't about the Taiwan video game deaths - this is just used as a vehicle for what seems like a undergraduate dissertation on video game addiction.The book seems confused on its purpose. At first it seems to be discussing video game obsession, but it then trails off in other directions, occasionally coming back to the Taiwan vid [...]

    22. A thoughtful defence of and ode to gaming and its manifold qualities and human benefits. It's also a pretty good primer of recent developments in non-traditional forms (e.g. gaming as a channel for therapy / refuge / empathy / historical study). There's a ton of them I'd never heard of and some reach stratospheric levels of obscurity and geekiness (especially those surviving MMO's). Though 'Papers Please' looks awful. Reassuringly, it signs off with Grand Theft, reminding us of the glory of it a [...]

    23. ** Books 249 - 2015 **This books to accomplish New Author Reading Challenge 2015 and Yuk Baca Buku Non Fiksi 20153,2 of 5 stars! This books is revealed some facts why people have obsession into the video games and it kinda scary when people so addicted to video games can playing into three straight days in Online Games Cafe until they died for heart attack :OAnother fact i just know that The sims is the first game who can accept married with the same sex. The sims is my favorite video games ever [...]

    24. Tenia bastantes diferentes expectativas para este libro, buenas y malas, durante el principio me decepciono bastante pero a medida que avanzaba en el libro cada vez iba gustándome más y más. Es una mezcla de curiosidades, historias extraordinarias y análisis de situaciones que poca gente se atreve a hacer. Aunque creo que es muy difícil creo que es un libro que cualquier persona que tenga un mínimo interés de como los videojuegos afectan a las personas tendría que leer(padres, profesores [...]

    25. Very insightful and brilliantly written. I'm glad I bought this audiobook and spent days listening to it in the car on the way to work and back. The narrator read this wonderfully. The only bit I was disappointed in was the ending as it was pretty abrupt. Other than that, this is a highly recommended read/listen.

    26. I am so glad I never got into video games. However, this book is pretty interesting. I would have liked to delve a bit deeper into the violence and empathy side of things but all the topics covered are worth a read this book randomly spoils The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens so, there's that.

    27. An interesting series of video game stories and anecdotes; tangent the book. I can see how he's tried to link what he's talked about to the title, but I reckon this is one of those situations where the title is an attempt to garner press and build a conversation rather than accurately represent what the book is related to.

    28. This book contains a collection of essays about video games. Not all of them are about gamers dying, therefore the title of this book is a little bit misleading. Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed reading the stories and learned a lot of interesting bits of information about the designers, gamers and the games.Well written and entertaining.

    29. Interesting read. Addictive behaviours aside, for me, an unexpected take home message was one of hope and inspiration - particularly regarding potential understanding through storytelling that can be fostered through video games e.g challenge stereotyping, cross-cultural cooperation & respect, coping mechanisms for distressing or traumatic life-events

    30. As a gamer myself, I see how the writer is not biased when writing this book. He could clearly explain why video games are important to some, but sadly the topic is a bit misleading. It only discuss about 'death by video game' in early chapters and moved on to deeper analysis of video game exploration.

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