Jesus Behaving Badly: The Puzzling Paradoxes of the Man from Galilee

Jesus Behaving Badly The Puzzling Paradoxes of the Man from Galilee Everybody likes Jesus Don t they We overlook that Jesus wasJudgmental preaching hellfire far than the apostle PaulUncompromising telling people to hate their familiesChauvinistic excluding women from

  • Title: Jesus Behaving Badly: The Puzzling Paradoxes of the Man from Galilee
  • Author: Mark L. Strauss
  • ISBN: 9781633894037
  • Page: 280
  • Format: Audio CD
  • Everybody likes Jesus Don t they We overlook that Jesus wasJudgmental preaching hellfire far than the apostle PaulUncompromising telling people to hate their familiesChauvinistic excluding women from leadershipRacist insulting people from other ethnic groupsAnti environmental cursing a fig tree and affirming animal sacrificeAngry overturning tables and chasing moneyEverybody likes Jesus Don t they We overlook that Jesus wasJudgmental preaching hellfire far than the apostle PaulUncompromising telling people to hate their familiesChauvinistic excluding women from leadershipRacist insulting people from other ethnic groupsAnti environmental cursing a fig tree and affirming animal sacrificeAngry overturning tables and chasing moneychangers in the templeHe demanded moral perfection, told people to cut off body parts, made prophecies that haven t come true, and defied religious and political authorities While we tend to ignore this troubling behavior, the people around Jesus didn t Some believed him so dangerous that they found a way to have him killed The Jesus everybody likes, says Mark Strauss, is not the Jesus found in the Gospels He s a figure we ve created in our own minds Strauss believes that when we unpack the puzzling paradoxes of the man from Galilee, we find greater insight into his countercultural message and mission than we could ever have imagined.

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      Published :2018-01-21T12:36:01+00:00

    One thought on “Jesus Behaving Badly: The Puzzling Paradoxes of the Man from Galilee”

    1. Summary: Explores some of the disturbing acts and statements of Jesus, that actually reveal his counter-cultural message and mission.A number of years ago I was leading a Bible discussion with a group of students on Mark 7:25-30, where a Syrophoenician woman asks Jesus to drive a demon out of her daughter. He answers her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs” (Mark 7:27). A student in the group commented, "I understood ever [...]

    2. Why do people like Jesus so much?Mark Strauss thinks that if they read the New Testament a little more carefully, they might not. After all, Jesus “told people to hate their families, to cut off body parts, and to eat his flesh and drink his blood. He . . . upheld the special status of the Hebrews in a way we would call ethnocentric if not racist (Mk 7:24-30//Mt 15:21-28). With no women among the twelve apostles, he looks pretty chauvinistic” (p. 11).Strauss points out that Jesus acted in wh [...]

    3. Kind of an apologetic book on some of the seemingly strange sayings and actions of Jesus. The latter part of the book turns more toward paradox of the kingdom and resurrection. Makes a nice companion to God Behaving Badly.

    4. Jesus Behaving Badly explores the apparent contradictions in the life of Jesus. How can it be that some people view Jesus as a revolutionary and others view Him as a pacifist? Some people view Him as angry and others view him as loving. Some people consider Jesus an environmentalist and other claim He’s an earth scorcher. Some see Jesus through the lens of hellfire preacher and other see a gentle shepherd. Legalist or grace filled, sexist or egalitarian, and on and on.Some people look at one s [...]

    5. This book was written on a much more popular level than I had anticipated. Most of these chapters covered things most in a preaching or pastoral role would probably already know, though there were a few things in some chapters that were a bit new and very interesting to me. That being said, I would recommend it as something every church leader have in their library. It is very good for taking some of the more complex issues about Jesus' words and actions that seem to conflict with a modern pictu [...]

    6. From the Politically Correct to the conventional believer to the skeptic, there are things recorded in the New Testament that give pause to the reader. The historical Jesus is a mysterious and enigmatic figure. The author seeks to provide some answers to the pause giving sections of the Bible. Why did Jesus curse and kill a fig tree for having no fruit on it when it wasn’t even fruit bearing season? Why did Jesus call a Canaanite woman a dog? Are the Gospels, especially John, anti-Semitic? Why [...]

    7. There are a few interesting chapters - particularly on "family" and "environmentalism" - but overall there isn't much new or surprising in Strauss's book. It reads like a more-popular-level version of F.F. Bruces's "Hard Sayings of Jesus," but I appreciated the academic depth of Bruces's work a bit more.This is by no means a bad book. I enjoyed reading it and would probably recommend it to some of the students I work with who are curious about Jesus, but for anyone who is already well-acquainted [...]

    8. Whether you've read the Bible for years and find certain statements of Jesus out- of- character or you're new too it and are struggling with who Jesus is, Strauss has produced a good starting place for working through some if the more difficult passages. He doesn't waste words and at times leaves points of controversy unresolved, but he writes well and makes the complicated understandable.

    9. A good book to read when unpacking the "contrasts" of Jesus' character. A closer look at historical context and covenantal theology becomes the books conclusion. Awesome publisher by the way, but maybe I am a little bias. (;

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