The Red Eagles

The Red Eagles World War II is nearly over For the Russians the enemy is no longer Nazi Germany but the American behemoth that threatens to topple the Communist revolution Deep within the walls of the Kremlin Sta

  • Title: The Red Eagles
  • Author: David Downing
  • ISBN: 9781616955991
  • Page: 149
  • Format: Paperback
  • World War II is nearly over For the Russians, the enemy is no longer Nazi Germany, but the American behemoth that threatens to topple the Communist revolution Deep within the walls of the Kremlin, Stalin s top man hatches a brilliant plan that will alter the course of postwar history and it s all based on a deception as simple as the shell game Five years later, an atomWorld War II is nearly over For the Russians, the enemy is no longer Nazi Germany, but the American behemoth that threatens to topple the Communist revolution Deep within the walls of the Kremlin, Stalin s top man hatches a brilliant plan that will alter the course of postwar history and it s all based on a deception as simple as the shell game Five years later, an atomic bomb detonates deep within the borders of the Soviet Union, stunning the experts who had predicted that Russian science could not produce such a devastating weapon for at least another generation.The Red Eagles traces the adventures of two spies, Jack Kuznetsky and Amy Brandon, as they track down the most deadly force in the world while hiding their true allegiances and intentions from their compatriots They are the red eagles, sent to America by one of its enemies to steal the greatest secret of all the key to producing the atomic bomb.Critically acclaimed spy thriller writer David Downing draws fascinating portrayals of Stalin and Hitler as they determine the fate of the world, drawing us at breakneck speed from the Kremlin to Manhattan and Washington to Cuba and New Zealand.

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      Published :2018-06-17T16:23:57+00:00

    One thought on “The Red Eagles”

    1. I haven't read anything by this author but I was interested in the synopsis provided and decided to take a chance. I found the beginning of the story a bit confusing and it seemed to take a while for all of the main characters to take centre stage and for the story to start to gather momentum. Because the beginning was slow and confusing, the characters felt underdeveloped and their motivations weren't adequately explored which detracted from the story. The premise was interesting but the execut [...]

    2. Like so many others who have commented here I found this book disappointing after the Station series. Having said that, I thought it had its moments and was strongest when it emphasised the characters essential powerlessness when facing situations controlled by larger historical forces. In the end though it was let down by weak character development, rushed and at times implausible plotting and a really quite bad ending. I'm rounding it up to a three

    3. Disappointed. Downing is one of my favorite authors, because I loved the Station series. This book was a real let-down. Not at all like the Station series. Wish he would go back to those

    4. The Red Eagles was David Downing’s first “real” novel and showed the talent and interest in spies and World War II that later became the popular Station series. While the characters in the series, which took place over more than two decades, were fully developed, those in the earlier effort were more wooden, more like symbols of what they were representing. Nevertheless, here it is, reprinted after having made its first appearance almost three decades ago. And now the author has turned his [...]

    5. I've read all of Downaing's "Station" books and liked them very much. This book, involving Soviet chicanery in trying to steal weapons grade Plutonium from the US, was carefully plotted and moved quickly (after a slow start).The main characters lack full background development and clear motivation. At first it seemed that Jack Kusnetsky was going to be the protagonist a la John Russell. However, as the story evolved, there was less and less to admire or even sympathize with about him. How Jack b [...]

    6. In the David Downing tradition of 20th century historical novelsis one about a bizarre (but credible) Nazi-Soviet attempt to steal uranium-235 to be able to build atomic bombs, is really a study of political fanaticism, what people are willing to do (or not) for "a cause"(ei, kill with impunity, treacherous relations with everyone). As usual, Downing mixes fact with fiction. Klaus Fuchs, the nuclear scientist who passed nuclear secrets to the USSR, is a genuine historical character, as are the [...]

    7. This is a surprisingly short WW2 thriller and the first I have read by the author. Mr Downing has a good reputation for his “Station” series, so I was looking forward to getting a taste of the author.Set towards the end of the second world war, both Russia and Germany want the secrets of the atom bomb. One to protect itself in the future and one as a last gasp attempt to win the war. This story is mainly about the agents of both countries and an audacious to steel atomic material and those i [...]

    8. An early David Downing before he hit the jackpot with the 'station' series, Red Eagles is a Second World War story about goodish Germans and a US defector to the Soviet Union combing to steal uranium en route to Los Alamos.It's entertaining enough and well written, a charming love story and are two very good action sequences. David Lowther. Author of The Blue Pencil (thebluepencil) and Liberating Belsen (1 May 2015)

    9. This has had some unfavourable/mediocre reviews, but I loved it. I've read several of DD's Station series and though clearly the character development in a one off novel can never compare to what can be achieved in a really well done series, I just really liked the plotting here. It may seem like madness but the obsessions of dictators always make for fertile ground in a spy thriller and this one just leans to the right side of credible in the race for atomic weapons.

    10. An early book by David Downing - without the great character development that followed in his station series. But The Red Eagles is a good thriller, with plenty of suspense and a terrific ending. Reading this book, among his first, shows how much Mr. Downing has progressed through the years and I look forward to the continuation of his WWI series.

    11. An interesting spy thriller. Russian spy-masters devise a daring plot. They send two spies (a man and a woman) to the U.S. to steal the key to producing the atomic bomb and they make it look like the Germans are responsible. Are the two of tem capable of carrying out this assignment? It's a page turner till the very end.

    12. The author of the "station" series ventures into new territory with a thriller set in the United States during WWII. He doesn't disappoint in this tale of Soviet espionage, double dealing and the theft of Plutonium to make an atom bomb.

    13. As a fan of Downing's station series, I looked forward to reading this earlier work. I found the beginning somewhat slow, but once all of the characters are identified and in place the story does pick up and then races to its conclusion. Overall, a quick read and entertaining.

    14. A good short spy story by one of my favourite authors with a little twist of two characters starting a new life in NZ. How many are out there in this country of ours.

    15. Very confusing at the start, not wonderful at the end. Disappointing compared to the Station series.

    16. I skipped the middle of this book. The story was a bit dull and the action was hard to find. The characters had a good standing.

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