Hand In Glove

Hand In Glove Who had a hand in the murder of a country gent All manner of friction fills the English country house shared by genteel retiree Percival Pyke Period and fuddy duddy lawyer Harry Cartell Until one of t

  • Title: Hand In Glove
  • Author: Ngaio Marsh
  • ISBN: 9780006166290
  • Page: 489
  • Format: Paperback
  • Who had a hand in the murder of a country gent All manner of friction fills the English country house shared by genteel retiree Percival Pyke Period and fuddy duddy lawyer Harry Cartell Until one of them, after a flamboyant dowager s treasure hunt party, is found murdered face down in the mire of an open drain Which of Superintendent Roderick Alleyn s suspects linked byWho had a hand in the murder of a country gent All manner of friction fills the English country house shared by genteel retiree Percival Pyke Period and fuddy duddy lawyer Harry Cartell Until one of them, after a flamboyant dowager s treasure hunt party, is found murdered face down in the mire of an open drain Which of Superintendent Roderick Alleyn s suspects linked by a tangled set of relationships wore a crucial, missing pair of gloves to commit this dirty deed

    • Best Read [Ngaio Marsh] ✓ Hand In Glove || [Psychology Book] PDF é
      489 Ngaio Marsh
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Ngaio Marsh] ✓ Hand In Glove || [Psychology Book] PDF é
      Posted by:Ngaio Marsh
      Published :2018-09-17T01:49:30+00:00

    One thought on “Hand In Glove”

    1. It's never possible to read just one Ngaio Marsh, is it?I finished Dead Water and pretty much immediately picked up Hand in Glove. A really satisfying mystery with an interesting cast. A really strong, satisfying solution.

    2. A period piece with characters drawn larger than life - the pretence of class showing in the stiffness of the characters. Who has killed a stuffy, pernickety and fussy lawyer? Alleyn must discover the murderer whilst pondering on the importance of a dog called Pixie. Great fun!

    3. Hand In Glove is a "full" novel that proceeds along a steadfast path through and with romance, pets, parties, resentments, pride, and of course, suspicion, murder, and Superintendent Alleyn. I love Ngaio Marsh because her books seem timelesse murders and people could all take place today, with a bit more assistance from technology:)

    4. For some reason this was not as satisfying as most of the Alleyn books. It may have been the characters, only one or two of which were really likeable, although that is not always a disappointment. Percival Pyke Period (what a name!) is sharing the house with a lawyer, Henry Cartell, who owns a very obnoxious dog. Henry's sister also lives nearby; she has a very obnoxious ward called Moppett, on whom she dotes. One of Period's quirks is writing condolence letters to people who have lost someone. [...]

    5. This is another Inspector Alleyn mystery, more or less set in a country house, with a cast of over-the-top society characters. Published in 1962, it's set in the 50s. However, exceptfor one or two internal references, the story could just as well be set in the 20s. It's a competent mystery but didn't engage me, not least because one of Marsh's writing tics---using the verb "ejaculate" instead of "exclaim" or the equivalent, over and over again---got to be very annoying very soon.

    6. Overall, a decent mystery. There were two different suspects that evidence pointed to for quite a while and if it had turned out to be either, I would have been disappointed. It would have been way too obvious, but in the end there was a twist. The characters are more than cookie cutter but the romance that develops between two characters, like most mysteries, doesn't come off well. I'm not reading this for the romance, but you almost wonder why they bother if they don't put a little bit more ef [...]

    7. Small village, Alleyn of course knows some of the people from his past. The hired secretary on the murder scene turns out to be friends with Roderick and Troy, and the interaction between Alleyn and Nicola is rather refreshing. Also the little romance that starts up is not between suspects. Nice comfortable little mystery read in between the other things I am trying to get through because I "think I should read." Really, too many books and too little time.

    8. Hand in Glove by Ngaio Marsh - GoodThe second of my tea and mystery sweepstakes winnings and a perfect choice.How did I not know about the Superintendent Alleyn mysteries? Vintage/cosy crime, this one was written in 1962 (Hmm, vintage? I'm older than that!) Very much in the Agatha Christie vein, along the lines of a country house murder. Nice little mystery, some obvious clues and red herrings and some less so. Nicely wrapped up at the end.I shall be looking out for more on my travels.

    9. Good readIf you like Agatha Christie’s books you will enjoy the Inspector Allleyn mystery series. They are very well written and have well defined characters. I am looking forward to starting another one.

    10. One of Marsh's more interesting mysteries. I think I've read this before although I really can't remember the plot, so I went for the obvious suspect with the obvious motive. I was mistaken though, so it's delightful to still be surprised.

    11. Three stellar stories in a row. I did have an inkling of the culprit in this book but I wasn't sure. Still, fun, especially with a smattering of Troy.

    12. My copy has a Blue binding, and a stylized hand on the dust jacket, but is cited as First Edition on the reverse of the title page.

    13. Great characters in this book. Several laugh out loud descriptions of people. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    14. Ngaio Marsh, New Zealand crime writer and theatre director, wrote many mysteries beginning in 1933. Love these vintage mysteries and this one was not easy to solve. The murderer was not someone I suspected at all. Not sure about the motive but it was a good, good, read.

    15. Originally published on my blog here in February 1999.This is another Marsh novel which is very much in the rather unfortunate shadow of Agatha Christie. The cast of characters, upper class, Home Counties village dwellers, could come out of a number of Christie's novels, and there is not much of Marsh's personality in this book.The plot itself is not particularly interesting; Mr Harold Carteret's dead body is found under a large, heavy pipe in a ditch being dug by workmen, following a party held [...]

    16. I read this book a loooong time ago; would that I had started keeping track of my reading much, much earlier! So even 1973 is just a guess, it might have been in the late 60s. I don't remember it very well, in fact I've just requested the DVD version from the library and expect to be surprised by whodunit. I remember enjoying Inspector Roderick Alleyn, another of those upper-class detectives in the mode of Wimsey and Campion, but with the difference that he has actually joined the police force ( [...]

    17. This is my first excursion into Marsh territory. As I've been reading more British mysteries, I was wanting to read a tale of Alleyn.I liked the characterization as written. The effort is melodramatic and should have been edited. Considering how long it takes for the reader to get to the core of the mystery, alot of is tread over and over with little sustenance. Especially considering how the story ends.The setting descriptions seemed very lacking. Again considering how the mystery eventually un [...]

    18. #22 in the series and this one seems “grayer,” if that makes any sense. That’s the sense I get from several of the Golden Age mystery authors: that their work lost some color and vitality from the 1930s when they began their careers to the 1960s. Perhaps they felt their books needed to get more “realistic” to meet the desires of a changing audience, or perhaps they each felt more somber and subdued after World War II. Perhaps they weren’t quite sure how to react to the social and cul [...]

    19. [These notes were made in 1985:]. A domestic melodrama this time, with an eccentric snob called Mr Pyke Period, his lodger who appears to die accidentally in an open ditch, and a series of complicated relations & near-relations. There is the obligatory cooing young couple whom no-one really suspects; there's a thoroughly bad lot who should have done it but didn't, and there's "The Moppet," his girlfriend. It turns out to be the elderly frump, protecting "The Moppet" from just retribution for [...]

    20. J'avoue que j'ai été très déçue par ce livre. L'écriture de Ngaio Marsh est toujours aussi agréable mais l'histoire en elle-même, ainsi que son déroulement, sont sans grand intérêt. Il faut attendre la moitié du livre pour qu'enfin il se passe quelque chose et je dois dire qu'arrivée à ce stade-là de ma lecture, je n'étais plus intéressée. Ce livre m'a fait penser à Agatha Christie dans ses mauvais jours. La campagne anglaise, de nombreux personnages divers et variés mais au [...]

    21. I read this as part of an omnibus with "Dead water" and "Death at the Dolphin". This was originally published in 1962. I thought that I had read this before but the plot was unfamiliar and I did not guess the murderer so perhaps I had not read it before.There are the usual array of bizarre characters in a village and the author describes them in an amusing fashion and pokes fun at the snobbery of some of them. There is a murder and Alleyn, who now seems to be a Superintendent, and his team are c [...]

    22. There we go! One fun aspect of being on with people who are actually my friends in real life is that occasionally we discuss what we are reading. One real-life friend saw my previous reviews of Ngaio Marsh books, read that I very much liked her as an author, and lent me this book, which I hadn't yet read, and very much enjoyed. Thank you! This book was more to my liking -- later Marsh, rather than earlier -- and had a denouement that, while unexpected, in hindsight was admirably foreshadowed. W [...]

    23. Pleasant, but forgettable. There were only a very few suspects, and Alleyn solves the mystery within a day. It would've been more interesting if there had been a wider field - perhaps the wholesome young lovers and the comfortable butler-cook duo could have fallen under suspicion as well, instead of being quickly established as innocent. As it is, there really isn't a mystery at all - the Bad Young Lovers are obviously a red herring, and not even an interesting one at that.Also it needed more Tr [...]

    24. This book was somewhat spoilt for me by the reader - I 'read' it via audio book - mispronouncing Alleyn's name from story start to finish. No unusually, the actual solution to the mystery was a letdown, and the young lovers here were far less charismatic than most - neither were really suspects in the murder, and there was therefore no tension in their relationship. Marsh both sends up snobbery and indulges in it herself. One of her less memorable books.

    25. Of the six Marsh mysteries I've read so far this is my favorite! It's as much a romance as a murder mystery and shows Inspector Alleyn and his wife Troy as the splendidly capable and warmly enjoyable couple they were intended by the author to be. Nicola Maitland-Mayne and Andrew Bantling, the young lovers, wonderfully contrasted with less savory characters, moved me. Marsh's genius for black comedy is a delight.

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