The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting A New Age of Threat

The Future of Violence Robots and Germs Hackers and Drones Confronting A New Age of Threat From drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency the U S government has harnessed the power of cutting edge technology to awesome effect But what happens when o

  • Title: The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting A New Age of Threat
  • Author: Benjamin Wittes Gabriella Blum
  • ISBN: 9780465089741
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency, the U.S government has harnessed the power of cutting edge technology to awesome effect But what happens when ordinary people have the same tools at their fingertips Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology, and robotics mean that people than ever before have access to potentFrom drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency, the U.S government has harnessed the power of cutting edge technology to awesome effect But what happens when ordinary people have the same tools at their fingertips Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology, and robotics mean that people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies from drones to computer networks and biological agents which could be used to attack states and private citizens alike.In The Future of Violence, law and security experts Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum detail the myriad possibilities, challenges, and enormous risks present in the modern world, and argue that if our national governments can no longer adequately protect us from harm, they will lose their legitimacy Consequently, governments, companies, and citizens must rethink their security efforts to protect lives and liberty In this brave new world where many little brothers are as menacing as any Big Brother, safeguarding our liberty and privacy may require strong domestic and international surveillance and regulatory controls Maintaining security in this world where anyone can attack anyone requires a global perspective, with multinational forces and greater action to protect and protect against weaker states who do not yet have the capability to police their own people Drawing on political thinkers from Thomas Hobbes to the Founders and beyond, Wittes and Blum show that, despite recent protestations to the contrary, security and liberty are mutually supportive, and that we must embrace one to ensure the other The Future of Violence is at once an introduction to our emerging world one in which students can print guns with 3 D printers and scientists manipulations of viruses can be recreated and unleashed by ordinary people and an authoritative blueprint for how government must adapt in order to survive and protect us.

    • ✓ The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting A New Age of Threat || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Benjamin Wittes Gabriella Blum
      482 Benjamin Wittes Gabriella Blum
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting A New Age of Threat || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Benjamin Wittes Gabriella Blum
      Posted by:Benjamin Wittes Gabriella Blum
      Published :2018-08-18T04:09:06+00:00

    One thought on “The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting A New Age of Threat”

    1. Disappointing overall, and at times shallow and boring. One emerges with the assessment that the two authors are easily impressed by surface-level phenomena. They maintain that narratives taught in civics class suffice to illuminate the origins and practice of politics. They perceive a simple world, where stated intentions equal actual objectives, costs can be judged relative to ostensible objectives without minding actual effects, correlation generally implies causation, and the direction of th [...]

    2. Research gem! This book reads as an exhaustive summary and contextual theories on the technological advances that have shaped our lives for better or worse. Our innovation continues to comfort, elevate and destroy us in astounding ways. Oceans and buildings cannot keep any of us apart and that is both beautiful and dangerous. I particularly appreciated the in-your-face excerpts on privacy since we demand it from the government yet keep broadening the access, person to person, without any regard [...]

    3. a poorly conceived argument which fails at nearly every juncture to promote a deeper understanding of violence, focusing instead on the rapidly advancing technological means that empower non-state actors to be able to conduct it. i could tell something was wrong with the book early on, when the authors presented a thought experiment along the lines of "what if the bp oil spill happened, with everything the exact same, but only it was terrorists that did it and not an accident?". it felt like the [...]

    4. Started out to be about the technology, then took a hard turn to some history of governance and then governance and legal theory. Interesting read, but not what I expected.

    5. So the title is misleading; as this book is more concerned with who will have the power/monopoly of violence in the future. Wittes focuses on how disrupting technologies will effect both those that currently have power and those that will gain power in the future.Why I started it: This book caught my eye in an Audible 2 for 1 sale.Why I finished it: Futuristic predictions and philosophy is not my go to genre, so this book was an interesting introduction to a new way of thinking about the future [...]

    6. I really liked this book It's a good examination of how advancements in technologies influence the ability (of both governments and individuals) to both defend and commit violence. It offers an interesting examination of the role of the state in protecting citizens, how it has changed over time and how it might change when subject to technological pressures. Worth reading again.

    7. This book is provocative but the concepts are rather basic. I also think the authors does not do a good job to explain a few things, I.e. when they briefly use an example of large volumes of data and says "this is what big data is". Big data is not only lots of data. It makes me think if the other things that he explained are also incorrect like when elaborated on jurisdiction, chemical weapons and others.

    8. Modern re-hashing of Hobbes and the importance of not constantly chaining down the Leviathan because the number of threats and vulnerabilities our global civilization face today are so numerous and wide spread that hurting the Leviathan will only come back to bite us.Technology is empowering both organizational and individual actors in unprecedented levels, making single individuals capable of causing tremendous harm to untold thousands of people. Without anyway to push back and create a more ba [...]

    9. While I don't agree with all the points and possible conclusions, as an IT Professional I see many of these issues an big problems and I am worried that they ain't being taken seriously enough. I am glad to see these points brought to people's attention and I think more people need to read books like this so a discussion on how to proceed as a nation can happen. With our current politicians making jokes about wiping email servers with a cloth I worry that we are a long way from taking IT securit [...]

    10. The authors did a very thorough job of researching and presenting their material. This is a very thought provoking book on the title subjects. While most of what they wrote is valid, there are some statements made that I disagree with. I would give this work a 5 star rating for research, effort and drive. Overall I would give it a 3.5 due to the wordiness. Their explainations, case studies are quite thorough and in many cases not really needed as the informed reader believes much of what they sa [...]

    11. I was not sure to give this book 3 or 4 stars (I would say it is 3.5 stars) I decided to go with 4 because it covers a really interesting topic. The technology empowers people in a non-precedent scale. This mass empowerment together with it is transnational nature challenge many of the concepts of the rule and sovereignty of the state within its territory. The authors discuss many ideas and historical concepts of the state and the possible effects of the new technology of violence on them. I wou [...]

    12. A boring and repetitive writing style mar what could have been an interesting subject. The author is primarily focused on political theory, not the technological or tactical aspects one might expect. That isn't a bad thing necessarily, but is a little disappointing. The subject matter coupled with the dry, repetitive, intro to polisci level of writing, means this book did not live up to my expectations and I would not recommend it.

    13. How can you make such an exciting topic this boring? Oh, yeah, you can talk about legislature for half of the book. I should've seen this coming after the introductory disclaimers: "we're not experts on technology" - what are you going to talk about then? Figures. Loved the idea of mechanical spiders injecting businessmen with poison - a brief respite in an otherwise pedestrian exercise in fearmongering.

    14. Chapter 1 is a very good standalone article about the emerging threats from interconnected computers, biology and eventually robotics and even nanotechnology. After that, a lot of the book devolves into poli sci 101 about the social contract which basically concludes that states are less useful as non-state actors are growing more lethal.

    15. This book is not what the title says it is. Sure it discusses violence and its possible future manifestations, but it's mostly a philosophical analysis of freedom, security, privacy, and the role of the government in protecting its citizens from the Hobbesian state of nature. I found the book informative and thought provoking, but not particularly compelling.

    16. Fascinating discussion of emerging security threats, focusing on the concept of "many-to-many" technologies that empower individuals or small groups to harm large numbers of people. The authors' primary interest is in the new governance and policy problems that these technologies create for states. I found their discussion of privacy and cybersecurity particularly unusual and enlightening.

    17. This book was surprisingly nothing like it's title. It seems like it spent about 100 pages on the topic of the title (robots, germs, future of warefare) and then the rest was on forms of government, liberty, how states will deal with each other. So I was very disappointed.

    18. What a disappointment! The title is rather misleading as the book focuses on security, not violence. Nevertheless, the topic seemed interesting. Unfortunately, it got butchered by the tedious way it was presented. Barely finished it.

    19. I don't know how the authors made a book about violence so dull. In part it was because much of the time they weren't really writing about violence but security concerns. It was frequently repetitive, using the same examples.

    20. Interesting so far, but due back at the library so back on the "to read" shelf it goes since I can't renew it now.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *