How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position

How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position About the Book Funny and sad satirical and humane How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position tells the interlinked stories of three unforgettable men the flamboyant Ravi the fundamen

  • Title: How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position
  • Author: Tabish Khair
  • ISBN: 9789350293225
  • Page: 110
  • Format: Hardcover
  • About the Book Funny and sad, satirical and humane, How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position tells the interlinked stories of three unforgettable men the flamboyant Ravi, the fundamentalist Karim and the unnamed and pragmatic Pakistani narrator whose trajectories cross in Denmark As the unnamed narrator copes with his divorce, and Ravi, despite his exteAbout the Book Funny and sad, satirical and humane, How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position tells the interlinked stories of three unforgettable men the flamboyant Ravi, the fundamentalist Karim and the unnamed and pragmatic Pakistani narrator whose trajectories cross in Denmark As the unnamed narrator copes with his divorce, and Ravi, despite his exterior of sceptical flamboyance falls deeply in love with a beautiful woman who is incapable of responding in kind, Karim their landlord goes on with his job as a cab driver and his regular Friday Quran sessions But is he going on with something else Who is Karim Why does he disappear suddenly at times or receive mysterious phone calls When a terrorist attack takes place in town, all three men find themselves embroiled in doubt, suspicion and, perhaps, danger An acerbic commentary on the times, How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position is also a bittersweet, spell binding novel about love and life today About the Author Born in 1966 and educated mostly in a small town of Bihar, India, Tabish Khair is the author of various critically acclaimed poetry collections, studies and novels Winner of the All India Poetry Prize and fellowships at Delhi, Cambridge and Hong Kong, his novels The Bus Stopped 2004 , Filming A Love Story 2007 , and The Thing About Thugs 2010 have been translated into several languages and shortlisted for major prizes, including the Encore Award UK , the Crossword Prize, the Hindu Best Fiction Prize, the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature India and the Man Asian Literary Prize Hong Kong Khair lives in rhus, Denmark, now.

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      Published :2018-09-26T09:21:00+00:00

    One thought on “How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position”

    1. If you're going to begin a book by telling the reader that it is "a full account of the events that have exercised considerable media attention in Denmark in recent months and that involved me," and then refer repeatedly to said event in ominous tones, by the time the reader gets to these events, they had better be worth it. This is particularly true when the events don't even take centre stage occur until almost the 90% mark. Unfortunately this book didn't live up to its own hype and I found th [...]

    2. I really enjoyed this. Funny, clever and very tender beneath the over-educated ironic bombast. Po-co English Lit does sharehouse bro novel is a strangely satisfying genre it seems.I feel obliged to note that the female characters exist mainly as plot points for the men, which is a bit of an issue in any case but more so in a novel that treats its male characters to such humanity. But it fits with with the first person unreliable narrator. I really liked that 'cultural difference' is sort of the [...]

    3. Three men from the Indian subcontinent, a motley lot, share a house in the very orderly city Aarhus in Denmark. The three could not have been more different from one another - one being a Pakistani Muslim, another Indian Hindu, and the third an Indian Muslim. Very frequently it is seen that people from the subcontinent find it easier to develop camaraderie once they are outside their region of geographical origin. These three men develop a friendship and share important events in their respectiv [...]

    4. I loved this book. I found it to be brilliantly profound, though provoking, subtle and clever in a highly accessible and enjoyable way. It has a great cast of characters and It gets into your head without you realising it. You think you know it all , but this story makes you think again. It challenges your preconceptions but in a really fun and down to earth way I found thoroughly engaging.I Highly recommend this book. It didn't take me long to read but left me with a greta deal to ponder and th [...]

    5. What a witty and ironic little book! I couldn't put this book down until I had finished it. Reading this book has been a total "glass full" experience.

    6. I liked this short novel more and more as it went on. Initially I was a bit put off by its laddishness. But I grew to care for all the characters, was gripped by the plot and enjoyed the comedy and poignancy. A real tale for our times

    7. Tabish Khair has written a marvelously entertaining novel full of tittering sexual references and darkly subtle, but equally quirky religious and socio-political themes. If one is expecting a certain amount of satire, you won’t be disappointed. But more often than not, Khair tries to disarm serious subjects not only through satire but also through a light, entertaining tone, laced with his witty language. The title refers to two sub-plots that drive a much broader story and theme of which the [...]

    8. Tabish Khair is quickly turning into one of my must-read everything by authors. With this and "the thing about thugs", he has to me proven to have a unique voice in creating characters from the sub-continent. Delightful, ironic and twisted little story.

    9. This book is set in a town I know very well but in a community I know nothing about. In some ways it was an eye opener for me. I think all Danes should read it to see our society from a different angle

    10. How could I not buy this book when it has a blurb like that? lol sounds like a fun read - looking forward to it. :)

    11. a nice novel, eventhough its titel is somehow misleading, but i enjoyed reading it. During reading, I had the feeling that i know the characters and I like them.

    12. This is quite an interesting book for sure.It had some very clever insights into relationships and human failures and some specific lines I really did enjoy, e.g.:"Perfection condems you to glorious mediocrity. It is in the gap between your imperfections, honestly faced, and your desire for something beyond perfection that you can achieve genius. Perfect pitch, perfect life, perfect love - these are dead-ends."Yet overall this book seemed like a little bit too in your face with its cleverness. T [...]

    13. The narrator, a thoroughly secularized Pakistani Muslim who teaches English literature at a university in Denmark, and his friend Ravi, a Hindu from India pursuing a PhD in history, take rooms in the flat of a fundamentalist Muslim. Frequent foreshadowing lets us know that they will eventually become caught up in a terrorist incident, though that incident, when it finally comes very near the end of the novel, [spoiler alert] doesn't really amount to much. And that, I guess, is partly the point. [...]

    14. The narrator, a thoroughly secularized Pakistani Muslim who teaches English literature at a university in Denmark, and his friend Ravi, a Hindu from India pursuing a PhD in history, take rooms in the flat of a fundamentalist Muslim. Frequent foreshadowing lets us know that they will eventually become caught up in a terrorist incident, though that incident, when it finally comes very near the end of the novel, [spoiler alert] doesn't really amount to much. And that, I guess, is partly the point. [...]

    15. I picked up this book while in the library studying for my biology exam. As with every exam season, I always manage to discover my dormant avid-reader. As is custom, I make a point to pick up any book whose author has any slight Islamic or Asian affiliation. With a name like Tabish Khair, he comfortably fit into the former, and so I proceeded to read the book despite being mildly surprised by the title and start of the book. I pushed through it, driven by the need to find myself in the novel; I [...]

    16. The narrator is a non practicing Muslim from Pakistan, his best friend is a Hindu and they live in a rooms in a flat rented to them by an Egyptian taxi driver who leads Koran study groups on Fridays. They live in Denmark.Forget your conceptions of who these people are and what their political leanings are. This book will turn them on their head. I liked the voice of the book and found the characters quite interesting. The payoff at the end of the novel was a bit pallid considering the build up. [...]

    17. The quotes on the back don't really do this book justice. It's certainly not an immigrant story nor a thriller. Quite simply it's a story of man but what differs is this man is not the usual white male protagonist with the story being told by a man from Pakistan. It's a wry read leading up to the same kind of denouement as "A Prayer for Owen Meany" with all the little dominoes lined up without the reader noticing. Overall, I'd say it's a cleverer read than it first appears and doesn't challenge [...]

    18. The best book I've read this year. It was so much better than I thought it would be, the characters were really engaging and I had to ration my reading so I didn't zip through it too fast. Loved it.

    19. This was so good. The characters were compelling. I could hear their voices so clearly in my head.It was a great and thought provoking read.

    20. A book review is never objective but when I know the person who has written it, it becomes less so. Not that I would be untruthful, exaggerate or overpraise on account of a friendship. It’s just impossible to separate the experience of reading from the friendship or the knowledge of the writer. This felt particularly true while reading Tabish Khair’s fabulously titled How to fight Islamist terror from the missionary position. Tabish and I met at a Danish folk high school, me on a year abroad [...]

    21. A Deceptive Book With a Marvelous TitleThe marvelously quirky title is actually a pretty good indicator of what to expect from this almost-marvelous quirky book. Though if you expect satire or some kind of romp, that's not what you'll get—rather, serious subjects treated in a disarmingly urbane way. As the title implies, there are two main threads: Islam and the romantic lives of the various characters. Both are treated in oblique, unexpected ways; my only serious problem with the novel is tha [...]

    22. This novel exemplifies the complexities of Western Europe's collective attitude towards the "brown" people and Islam, with heavy doses of white on brown and brown on brown prejudices. Set in Denmark against the backdrop of acts of terror against Danish public figures, Khair's work incorporates an interesting premise, the guilt by association of two "brown" men who rent space from an Islamic man who leads a Koran study groups when bonafide acts of terrorism occur in the country.In the end, it is [...]

    23. The title is interestingly attractive but somewhat misleading as he narrator does more to avoid the Islamist Terror issue than fight it.The story immerses the reader in displacement, in intersecting cultures and in the dynamics of love affairs within a complex, often confused context. When it comes down to it, it's the ordinary things of human relationships that prevail, the things common to humanity.It's an interesting book, a little challenging in places I found, not so much for its attitudes [...]

    24. Reading this book unfortunately coincided with the horrible murders of cartoonists in Paris, but perhaps it would put too big a load on a novel to expect it to address the complex issues which the Paris murders raised. It does though, give a convincing view of the reality of life for relatively privileged people from the Indian sub-continent now living in Europe, and the varied nature of their relationships with traditional religions, especially Islam. Two bright young men, one Muslim by backgro [...]

    25. A strange story about a small incident in a big context. The non-existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq provides a context for much of our daily lives. Perhaps an unseen, ubiquitous and insidious filter rather than a context. The characters in this book are seen and themselves look through that filter a decade on. Add to that migration, refugees, the shifting sands of European politics, religions in focus and madmen with guns and you have life in Europe. The characters in a small unive [...]

    26. I'm not entirely sure what to make of the book. I saw the twist coming from the very beginning. I think its a very slight, yet laboured way to look at racism within Europe and the way that Muslims/immigrants are encouraged to be suspicious of one another. I also felt that the conception of Karim's 'Islam' was a little essentialised and one dimensional. I think I needed up reading much of the dialogue in a Pakistani accent (I'm allowed, I'm Pakistani). I did enjoy reading about the immigrant expe [...]

    27. Excellent. I fell into the trap of thinking this book was going to turn out incredibly differently from how it did. I learned a lesson from this book, alongside the protagonist - I learned not to make presumptions about people.I also very much enjoyed the subplot of whether a glass half full of love was better than a glass overflowing with love. It made me think a lot, but the type of thinking that doesn't feel like a chore, which in my opinion is what a good book should do.The writing was exqui [...]

    28. "Khair skillfully deploys his double perspective: first, like the narrator, we wonder why we did not suspect Karim’s involvement earlier; later, again like the narrator, we wonder why we permitted ourselves to doubt Karim’s goodness at all. Khair would like us to convict ourselves of a too-easy prejudice, and, to some extent, we do." - M. D. Allen, University of Wisconsin–Fox ValleyThis book was reviewed in the May 2014 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our [...]

    29. How to Fight Islamist Terror from the Missionary Position by Tabish Khair. This true story of the flat mate of a fundamental Islamist implicated in a terror plot in Denmark is an interesting read. It's easy language told from the perspective of a moderate Pakistani make this an easy read, a page turner. When the events come to a head it feels somewhat empty, a story with its core missing. It is quirky and insightful but ends up a well crafted shell that holds nothing in it.

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