The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War

The Storm of War A New History of the Second World War Roberts spopulist approach makes for a rollicking good read and never comes at theexpense of accuracy His mastery of the huge variety of subjects is trulyimpressive and his ability to marshal these su

  • Title: The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War
  • Author: Andrew Roberts
  • ISBN: 9780061228605
  • Page: 414
  • Format: Paperback
  • Roberts spopulist approach makes for a rollicking good read and never comes at theexpense of accuracy His mastery of the huge variety of subjects is trulyimpressive and his ability to marshal these subjects into a single compellingnarrative stunning The Daily TelegraphHailedby The Economist as Britain s finest military historian forbestsellers such as Masters and Co Roberts spopulist approach makes for a rollicking good read and never comes at theexpense of accuracy His mastery of the huge variety of subjects is trulyimpressive and his ability to marshal these subjects into a single compellingnarrative stunning The Daily TelegraphHailedby The Economist as Britain s finest military historian forbestsellers such as Masters and Commanders and Waterloo, AndrewRoberts offers a magisterial new history of World War II and the Axis strategythat led the Germans and Japanese to their eventual defeat Perfect for readershoping to gain new insight into WWII s pivotal battles and campaigns, fromDunkirk to D Day, The Storm of War is a powerful, penetrating, andcompulsively readable examination of the causes, currents, and consequences ofthe Second World War.

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      Published :2018-09-19T01:52:41+00:00

    One thought on “The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War”

    1. I’ve been boning up on some history lately and I thought it about time I covered WWII. I already knew the basics, of course, but I’d still regularly come across accounts of battles and other details of the war that would surprise me - I really didn’t have a full mental picture of events. It was time to get the full low-down. I take in non-fiction best via audio, especially if it’s a long and heavy account and more particularly if it’s full of facts and figures. This way I can let it fl [...]

    2. This is the first one-volume history of World War II that I’d really place in a category of reevaluation by an author who views the war from a comfortable distance in time, but then I’m not expert, not even, really, an amateur aficionado even though I’ve read a lot about the war, including biographies of the personalities and memoirs by the participants.Roberts’ thesis is that the Allies did not so much win the war as Hitler lost it, in large part by making independent judgments based on [...]

    3. Someday, someone will write a great one volume history of the Second World War. But it won't be Andrew Roberts.The book is all right when it comes to the European/African theaters, though Roberts does indulge in Anglo-American triumphalism. But when he turns to the Pacific, the triumphalism turns to Eurocentricism and piss-poor research. Although his narrative of the European conflict begins before the war with the Anschluss, dismemberment of Czechoslovakia and "Peace for our time," he begins hi [...]

    4. I want to read Winston Churchill's six-volume history of World War II, and before doing that, decided to go through a modern British one-volume popular book on the subject. This is a rather conventional history book; the author is a British patriot who berates Eire for being neutral in the war, since had Hitler won, he would have trampled this neutrality. It makes gross mistakes having to do with the Soviet Union. A million and a half former Soviet POWs were sent to the Gulag or labor battalions [...]

    5. This is a quite large volume to read and one should take it's time with it or pick the time when you can really sit down with it.This book on the general history of WOII is not something to read when you have little or NO knowledge of the WOII. Even if this book is rather thick it does never explain everything it would have made the book far thicker in pages.The thesis of the writer is that AH lost the war instead of the Allies winning it. He does a decent job of proving it but at the end there [...]

    6. What "The Storm of War" does, it does fairly well. The book covers the war, at least the European part of it, comprehensively, although too breezily in places. It points out that while all of the members of the Grand Alliance made valuable contributions, the Soviet Union did the bulk of the fighting and the dying. Andrew Roberts points out that the Axis powers did or failed to do certain things that might have prolonged the war or even created a different outcome. He lays to rest certain myths, [...]

    7. Description: From "Britain's finest military historian" (The Economist) comes a magisterial new history of World War II and the flawed axis strategy that led to their defeat.The Second World War lasted for 2,174 days, cost $1.5 trillion, and claimed the lives of more than 50 million people. What were the factors that affected the war's outcome? Why did the Axis lose? And could they, with a different strategy, have won? Andrew Roberts's acclaimed new history has been hailed as the finest single-v [...]

    8. Deutsches Original untenProbably the moust superfluous newer representation, so much I have longed for the end of the second world war in no other Book in this topic. But even a such book has its good sides, you learn to better appreciate the classics.The biggest shock is to while the bias of a recent historian, who justifies the almost unnecessary battle of El Alamein by the imminent landing of the Americans in Morocco, with Britains need to do something for their own self-consciousness, before [...]

    9. An incredibly well-researched and brisk history of the battles of World War II that illustrates how personalities impacted the outcome as much as planning.The author argues that World War II was one of the first wars waged for political reasons, rather than military ones, and that this was ultimately what caused the Germans to lose. The book itself covers all the campaigns from beginning to end and offers a staggering amount of detailed figures of the troops and arms involved.The strategies of t [...]

    10. For a single volume history of WWII, I really didn't think it was very well done or contained new information. It focuses nearly exclusively on the European conflict and doesn't deal much at all with the causes of the war. I much prefer A Short History of World War II by James L. Stokesbury when it comes to single volume histories of WWII. Stokesbury spends much more time discussing the causes of the war, which is more interesting to me, as well as at least trying to cover some of the subtopics [...]

    11. These stories. Born in '52, the war over just 7 yrs. The immense scale is astounding. Thousands die in a day. People lived through this, yet there are times I can barely get out of bed. Humans are predators. If there isn't enough trouble in the world they'll go and make some.This book is full of battles, events, thought processes that I had never read of. Once again behind the scene revelations. The central thesis being that Hitler lost the war because of egregious errors. The Allies democratic [...]

    12. This book is the best single volume on the history of World War II that I have read to date. The amount of details and information Andrew Roberts cram into this book is amazing. As well as what you would expect in such a book, the author's analysis of key battles an characters are masterful, as well as a few new pieces of information recently de-classified This is definitely one author who know his stuff. As a self confessed World War II buff I found this book an enthralling and educational read [...]

    13. Roberts has produced a powerful piece of military history writing. Taking on a one-volume history of WWII, on of the most studied and written-about periods in the history of the 20th century was no small or easy task. Robert's book, "The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War" is a retrospective work that considers and takes into account what happened between 1939 in Europe and 1941 in the Pacific and the end of the war in both theaters of operation in 1945. The retrospective approa [...]

    14. Andrew Roberts adds yet another volume to the expansive list of World War II books - the causes, the battles, the leaders and key military figures - which begs the obvious question, "Do we really need another one?". Having read more than my fair share of books on this topic - and having just finished reading The Storm of War - my answer is yes - this book is for both the World War II novice and expert alike.This is labeled a "new" history and there are a few new tidbits chronicled here. For inst [...]

    15. Every year there are another dozen books about World War II, with maybe one or two worth reading. The Storm of War is a new history, as the subtitle points out, and with large numbers of government records, oral histories, and private papers being released all the time a "new" history can bring a good deal of evidence to back up a new interpretation. Andrew Roberts' book does just that.Another thing his book does is to put the emphasis on the eastern front that it deserves. I tend to read about [...]

    16. This book is a fairly comprehensive (610 pages) history of World War II trying to make some new interpretations and make use of some more recent archival materials. It is a quick read and engaging, even if you already have read a lot about WWII.What I liked the most about this book was that the author takes a clear perspective - namely that Germany (Hitler) largely lost the war because of several egregious errors (invading USSR, declaring war on the US, etc.) and this had these mistakes been avo [...]

    17. The numbers and scale of the Second World War is truly great, which completely justified the huge interest it still creates. Although the author manages to talk about many wars on the Asian front, but his focus is really on the Western front. He leaves many questions unclear.Why did the Japanese enter the war? What were their reasons as they clearly could not attack mainland USA so what were they hoping to achieve?Would communism have prevailed in China if Chiang Kai Shek was given equal billing [...]

    18. This is a perfectly fine one volume treatment of WW II and I have no problem recommending it. That said, it suffered from several weaknesses. While each paragraph reads just fine, there was often a strange lack of flow between paragraphs that was distracting and occasionally confusing. It's treatment of the war in the Pacific was little better than cursory, and seemed to lack the original research found in it's consideration of the European theater. It also failed to deliver on its promise with [...]

    19. I won this book through First Reads about 2 months ago and steadily kept up with reading it even though that meant juggling multiple books at once. Not something I like to do.Since I'm American, these are the things I was made aware of in public school regarding WWII: Pearl Harbor, D Day, Hitler is bad, Auschwitz, Anne Frank & A Bomb. I had never taken the time or effort to learn more about the war in my free time but am generally a fan of reading history books in order to learn. By nature o [...]

    20. While the book isn't an entirely comprehensive telling of World War II, it manages to serve as an excellent crash course in World War II history.Presenting the conflict in an almost narrative fashion, the book uses first hand accounts and somewhat prosaic terms to present the war in a way that makes Allied country heroic, especially the British Commonwealth countries like Canada and New Zealand. The Axis soldiers are generally presented as noble as well, although their leaders are thoroughly bas [...]

    21. It’s clear from this book that Andrew Roberts is a fan of recycling, as this book is little more than a rehashing of the war as covered by others. Contrary to the subtitle, there is little that is “new” here; instead the reader gets a fairly standard interpretation of the war that is largely dependent on the work of others. Worse, his account concentrates heavily on the ground war involving Germany; the war against Japan in Asia is covered in only three of the book’s eighteen chapters, w [...]

    22. Several outstanding one-volume histories of World War II appeared within the last year or two ("Inferno" by Max Hastings, Anthony Beevor's history, and this one). This book is the best of the three at providing a context for understanding the horrific nature of the war. The writing is excellent, and the analysis is unmatched.

    23. Enjoyed and agreed with the views and conclusions of Andrew Roberts. However, this being a shorter volume covering the war, much was omitted from the actions that occurred. For in depth study one must dive into specialized volumes of which there are hundreds.

    24. a very intense look at the second world war very detailed and ilearnt some things that inever knew before however the downside was that the book was very havy and the print too small

    25. Incredibly compelling single-volume history of WW2. Incorporates newly declassified information - especially about the eastern front. Highest possible recommendation.

    26. Good overall history, but not a whole lot of new information. For US readers a really good overview of the India/Burma theater. I also thinks he glosses over the Pacific Operations a little.

    27. Andrew Roberts’ 2011 book The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War is a superb and fascinating look at the deadliest conflict in human history. I previously read Roberts’ excellent 2014 biography of Napoleon Bonaparte, Napoleon: A Life, which I reviewed here. Roberts has a knack for choosing the telling historical detail that gets his point across in an entertaining way, and although he writes about very broad subjects, he never gets bogged down in historical minutiae.I read T [...]

    28. I enjoyed the book, and Roberts has a way with words that makes for quotable reading--admittedly, the book is probably better for introductory readers rather than experts, although I hope it isn't the last book anyone reads on the subject.The overall argument is solid: the cultural/political ideology of the Nazis caused them to make serious mistakes that cost them the war. Or, as Roberts succinctly puts it: Hitler lost primarily because he was a Nazi. Although obviously the war is more complex t [...]

    29. Uneven, though still great if you want a 101 guide. It largely ignores (or doesn't go into the details of) the Pacific theater and it also skips a few key-moments (maybe because he thought they are already well known or that it would slow the pace of the book down), but nonetheless it does a very good job of mixing historic informatiom with personal details of the people involved and the decision-making process. It also gives the reader a great opportunity to find out more about certain events, [...]

    30. A superb history of WWII (although a little Eurocentric, but I don't mind that) narrated by the great Christian Rodska, who also did the memoirs of Churchill. But it was so hard to by this audiobook. Audible said "We're sorry. Due to publishing rights restrictions, we are not authorized to sell this item in the country where you live." After a long search a found a store where, using a fake US address, I could buy it. There are still so many absurd things in the young ebooks and audiobooks marke [...]

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