Bomboozled: How the U.S. Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack

Bomboozled How the U S Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack Conceived by a misguided government seeking to quiet the fears of an anxious public the concept of the Family Fallout Shelter was Cold War paranoia at its finest a massive bit of propaganda by archi

  • Title: Bomboozled: How the U.S. Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack
  • Author: Susan Roy
  • ISBN: 9780982358573
  • Page: 218
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Conceived by a misguided government seeking to quiet the fears of an anxious public, the concept of the Family Fallout Shelter was Cold War paranoia at its finest, a massive bit of propaganda by architecture that has no truth behind it than the absurd notion of duck and cover Inundated with government sponsored films, posters, booklets, traveling caravans and exhibitConceived by a misguided government seeking to quiet the fears of an anxious public, the concept of the Family Fallout Shelter was Cold War paranoia at its finest, a massive bit of propaganda by architecture that has no truth behind it than the absurd notion of duck and cover Inundated with government sponsored films, posters, booklets, traveling caravans and exhibitions, the American family bought into the idea, investing millions of dollars in home shelters of every conceivable material and design Bomboozled How the U.S Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive a Nuclear Attack lays bare the buried truths of America s family fallout shelter obsession Author Susan Roy charts the panic fueled evolution of the shelter from a well stocked basement pantry to a full fledged and often completely decorated home addition, revealing through extensive archival photography, nuclear era memorabilia, and previously unpublished media, a government and people in the grip of self delusion Fastidiously researched and sharply written, Bomboozled captures the absurdity and uncertainty of a culture that knew no better than to trust its government s message Susan Roy is a writer and editor on architecture, design, and cultural history The founding managing editor of Allure magazine, she has also held senior editorial positions at This Old House, SELF, Good Housekeeping and Avenue She holds a master s degree in architectural history from Columbia University Bomboozled is loosely based on the subject of her master s thesis, The Family Fallout Shelter During the Cold War.

    • [PDF] ¼ Free Read ☆ Bomboozled: How the U.S. Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack : by Susan Roy ✓
      218 Susan Roy
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ¼ Free Read ☆ Bomboozled: How the U.S. Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack : by Susan Roy ✓
      Posted by:Susan Roy
      Published :2018-08-19T03:36:26+00:00

    One thought on “Bomboozled: How the U.S. Government Misled Itself and Its People Into Believing They Could Survive A Nuclear Attack”

    1. This was a cool book displaying how governmental propaganda differed from actual evidence during the Cold War. Dealt a lot with fallout shelters which were highly publicized even though they would provide no protection if a nuclear bomb was in fact dropped. While there wasn't a lot of text in the book there were a lot of pictures displaying things from the media during the time. A cool coffee table type book which will definitely be beneficial to my research project.

    2. In the 1950s and 1960s America’s Civil Defense agency promoted family bomb shelters as a necessary component to preserving life in the likely event of a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. The New York state legislature debated a bill that would have made it mandatory for every family to build a bomb shelter in their yard. Craziness gripped the land.This book shows that craziness graphically with the posters, drawings, detailed plans, and photos of bomb shelters produced back then. No excuses w [...]

    3. The pictures and so forth (which make up most of the book) are fine, and quite illuminating/amusing. The text however is much less so. It's not too surprising that this book was based upon a master's thesis, as it definitely has that seminar smell about it. Among the symptoms: frequent use of words and phrases like "empowerment," "micromanage," "blame the victim," and needless classroomy explanations and elaborations of concepts that we evidently are deemed to be too dim to comprehend unaided. I [...]

    4. A strange hybrid of thought provoking coffee-table book and cold-war history. The reproductions included are fascinating. The scary civil defence brochures range from upbeat propaganda to convince people they can survive nuclear war to horrifying warnings on the results of fallout filled with sick or dying stick figures. You see the government using a cynical mix of unfounded optimism and equally manipulative fear to keep people in line, often in the same materials. There are advertisements for [...]

    5. Great book about the Cold War and how the government tried to convince us that we could survive a nuclear attack with just a simple bomb shelter in our backyards or basements. One of the more absurd ideas was that if there was an attack, a family would have time to dig a hole in their backyard large enough for 4 people. The family would then all crawl into the hole and pull a piece of ply wood over the top, thereby creating a radiation fallout "fox hole". And people believed that stuff? The very [...]

    6. This book tells its story mainly through illustrations taken from a variety of books and pamphlets from the Cold War period. I found this delightful. The book does have a few pages dedicated to text, but the images really tell the story. I really liked the contrast between pictures of simple dugouts that were intended for families that couldn't afford the massive cost of a true shelter compared to the massive underground homes complete with pools, fake trees and programmable weather. There was a [...]

    7. Think "Atomic Cafe" set to print, with a special emphasis on fallout shelters. This journey onto the surreal world in which Americans were inundated with the notion that thermonuclear war could not only be survived, but that in fact there would be any legitimate reason to want to do so makes for some fine black comedy. And kudos to Susan Roy for bringing us up to date on the final page with a reminder of the Bush Administration's advice on duct tape and plastic sheeting for surviving a dirty bom [...]

    8. Don't let the kitzchy cover fool ya'. While the many exhibits shown in this book seem funny and far-fetched now; they were taken very seriously in their day (watch the documentary film "The Atomic Cafe" for more insights into this era). The big question is why was the US government trying to make people think they could survive in the most meager of shelters? Mom in her kerchief and dad with his pipe cozied down in their bomb shelter? While the threat really has not diminished (the bombs are sti [...]

    9. Great collection of images. Worth it just to page through to look at them. I really enjoyed the text as well however. I thought it was well researched and well organized. I did not care for the last page however. While I completely agree with what the author is saying there not everything needs to be tied into current events or be made to further an agenda. I would have been happier if the book didnt bring up 9-11. It was a great book without it and that addition was annoying.

    10. If you are looking for an insightful analysis of mass hysteria and Cold War propaganda - well, this is not that book. This is a coffee table book, meaning there's about two pages of text for every thirty pages of illustrations. The illustrations are amazing, though. Susan Roy has managed to dig up enough old magazine illustrations and bizarre rarities to make this worth a flip.

    11. Please, please read this book! It's a coffeetable examination on emotional manipulation of citizens by their government followed by some startling fear mongering for profit. It will take you one hour. Totally worth it.

    12. Nice collection of fallout-shelter ephemera from the 50s and 60s. Apparently not many shelters actually got built, despite massive PR campaigns by the Eisenhower administration. One guy in Texas did build an entire house underground, complete with yard and encased in concrete.

    13. Pretty dopey concept in terms of visuals - mostly reprinted photos, ads, etc. Interesting quick look at the "bomb shelter era." Browse it in a bookstore or library.

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