The Far Euphrates

The Far Euphrates In translucent prose Aryeh Lev Stollman has created a stunning portrait of the coming of age of a young man s soul Through the story of a lonely boy The Far Euphrates questions how we can find meani

  • Title: The Far Euphrates
  • Author: Aryeh Lev Stollman
  • ISBN: 9781573226974
  • Page: 421
  • Format: Paperback
  • In translucent prose, Aryeh Lev Stollman has created a stunning portrait of the coming of age of a young man s soul Through the story of a lonely boy, The Far Euphrates questions how we can find meaning in a post Holocaust world how we define the notions of home and family where the boundaries lie between sanity, madness, and transcendence and what our responsibilitiesIn translucent prose, Aryeh Lev Stollman has created a stunning portrait of the coming of age of a young man s soul Through the story of a lonely boy, The Far Euphrates questions how we can find meaning in a post Holocaust world how we define the notions of home and family where the boundaries lie between sanity, madness, and transcendence and what our responsibilities are to ourselves and to one another Infused with a rich mystical and scientific understanding, it poignantly addresses the insatiable human longing to know and reclaim our origins, the mythic far Euphrates of Eden, to which we can never return.

    • Best Read [Aryeh Lev Stollman] ✓ The Far Euphrates || [Philosophy Book] PDF ✓
      421 Aryeh Lev Stollman
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Aryeh Lev Stollman] ✓ The Far Euphrates || [Philosophy Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Aryeh Lev Stollman
      Published :2019-01-26T14:37:01+00:00

    One thought on “The Far Euphrates”

    1. I wanted to like this book more than I actually did. The topic sounded interesting -- coming of age, set in Canada right across from Detroit, a rabbi's family, Holocaust survivors, musings on the role of religion. But even though the elements were there and the writing had the feeling of poetry, it never really came together for me. I never really understood the concerns that the narrator's mother expressed about him, I found the descriptions of the Holocaust experiments depressing but almost be [...]

    2. The story is set in my hometown, and it's obvious the author grew up here, too. I kept hoping the story would get better, that something would be revealed that be gripping. I thought the character development of Alex's mother, in particular, fell short and impacted the depth of the story leaving it a bit shallow.No a bad read, but not a great read either.

    3. The four stars belong to the first chapter or so. Very captivating and inviting. The remainder of the book only gets three. Interesting, but not quite living up to the fourth star and its early promise.

    4. This is a sweet book - don't think I've ever said that before about a book. A boy, only child growing up in small town Canada, father a Rabbi, mother a sometime teacher. Isolated kid who prefers to be that way. His parents are also isolated (tho father is always busy as a Rabbi is) but with only two closse friends, a married couple, husband a talented Cantor and composer. The Cantor's twin sister also plays an important role in the life of the boy and his family. The twins are - we gradually lea [...]

    5. I enjoyed this book very much. I always read before bed and it kept me up late thinking about this young persons life. The book kept my attention throughout. I enjoyed his writing style and it was interesting to read how this young boy interpreted his relationship with his parents and friends. I believe Aryeh could have written a longer book about his life growing up. Maybe he will write another one about his University years and beyond.

    6. This book has a dual appeal to people interested in the role of religion (especially Judaism, of course) in leading a good life and those interested in the role of religious history and text in creating an inner life. Ethics and mysticism play equal roles. It's easy to find flaws in the plot, but there's something vibrant at the core of the book that makes it satisfying to me. You certainly can't call the book predictable, and to be fresh it has to take some risky turns.

    7. Pulled this out of a box after moving, searching for anything due to the recent closure of a public library in my area. It turned out to be a really interesting book. Powerful dialogue and honesty made this book so enjoyable. It was vulnerable, moving, and quite emotional. Finally steering away from the drugstore selections.

    8. This book was personally recommended to me this evening and reading the review here on that included the line, "e unpleasant feeling that even loving words are dangerous." I feel compelled to add it to my list!

    9. Wow. Well it took me probably a good 2/3 until I got into this book. But it really means something to me. It's about love, kindness, and pain. The kind so great you don't talk about it. Beautiful subtle book.

    10. I read this one right after 'Bad Haircut', and preferred both the storytelling and writing style of Stollman. The characters are outstanding and the air of nostalgia is nicely tempered with a clear-eyed account of family dynamics.

    11. I did not know anything about the author or book before I picked it up to read. It's a very good book. It's haunting. It's easy to read but has some profound themes involving friendship, family, coming of age, the Holocaust, parental love, etc. I'd recommend it.

    12. holy cow this was great. it (particularly the protagonist and his predicaments) reminded me a whole lot of edinburgh. the tone and prose and everything. all edinburgh. grate

    13. Liked that it was set in Windsor, across the Detroit River. The local references were familiar, but I was hoping to like this book a lot more than I did.

    14. I so cannot remember this book at all -- just that I read it as part of a "Holocaust in Literature" course in undergrad.

    15. Post World War II/Holocaust childhood of a Jewish boy in Canada, told with Biblical and Kabalistic language and imagery. It’s about understanding life and death, intellect and finally faith.

    16. This was a short but interesting read. It helped me to better understand the experience of children of survivors.

    17. This was one of the 1998 RUSA Notable Books winners. For the complete list, go to ala/ala/mgrps/divs/rus

    18. I have disliked few books as much as this one. A contrived patch work borrowed from so many that came before. The sentences moved like oxen one after another plowing a row that others plowed.

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