C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid: Arms and the Exile

C S Lewis s Lost Aeneid Arms and the Exile C S Lewis is best remembered as a literary critic essayist theologian and novelist and his famed tales The Chronicles of Narnia and The Screwtape Letters have been read by millions Now

  • Title: C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid: Arms and the Exile
  • Author: C.S. Lewis A.T. Reyes Virgil
  • ISBN: 9780300167177
  • Page: 298
  • Format: Hardcover
  • C S Lewis 1898 1963 is best remembered as a literary critic, essayist, theologian, and novelist, and his famed tales The Chronicles of Narnia and The Screwtape Letters have been read by millions Now, A T Reyes reveals a different side of this diverse man of letters translator.Reyes introduces the surviving fragments of Lewis s translation of Virgil s epic poem, whiC S Lewis 1898 1963 is best remembered as a literary critic, essayist, theologian, and novelist, and his famed tales The Chronicles of Narnia and The Screwtape Letters have been read by millions Now, A T Reyes reveals a different side of this diverse man of letters translator.Reyes introduces the surviving fragments of Lewis s translation of Virgil s epic poem, which were rescued from a bonfire They are presented in parallel with the Latin text, and are accompanied by synopses of missing sections, and an informative glossary, making them accessible to the general reader Writes Lewis in A Preface to Paradise Lost, Virgil uses something subtle than mere length of time It is this which gives the reader of the Aeneid the sense of having lived through so much No man who has read it with full perception remains an adolescent Lewis s admiration for the Aeneid, written in the 1st century BC and unfolding the adventures of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of the Romans, is evident in his remarkably lyrical translation.C S Lewis s Lost Aeneid is part detective story, as Reyes recounts the dramatic rescue of the fragments and his efforts to collect and organize them, and part illuminating look at a lesser known and intriguing aspect of Lewis s work.

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      Published :2019-01-07T04:42:11+00:00

    One thought on “C. S. Lewis's Lost Aeneid: Arms and the Exile”

    1. For those who love Lewis and the Classics, this is a gem. It would be fully worth five stars were it not for one unavoidable deficiency: Lewis translated less than a fourth of The Aeneid. Had he completed this project, it would have been a masterpiece. As it is, A. T. Reyes deserves our gratitude for preserving all that exists. Before we even encounter Lewis's Aeneid we are given a forward, preface, and introduction each worthy of close reading. Here we have Walter Hooper's narration of the manu [...]

    2. The only downside to Lewis' translation of the Aeneid, as far as I can tell, is the fact that it isn't complete. It is a joy to read what he did finish, though, and this is a good volume -- the Latin is alongside it for comparison (not that I speak Latin, alas, but I can wield a Latin-English dictionary and guess with the best of them), and it has a very good set of introductory notes, explaining what Lewis was aiming for and to what extent he achieved it.It's a pity he never finished it, but th [...]

    3. Surprisingly good. I'd expected something thoughtlessly adulatory (as Walter Hooper's editorial commentary always is) but found an enriching perspective and translation of (portions of) The Aeneid. No substitute, naturally, for reading the whole thing in another translation - I'd recommend Fagles - but still a version that will increase appreciation for Virgil and for the work of good translators.

    4. Wonderful, naturally. The only downside is that he never got to finish it. The introduction is also a fascinating read.

    5. I've long been intimidated by the Aeneid, so when I found that a partial translation survived by Lewis, I was glad to read what I could of the story in a familiar voice. Lewis's translation is, in my unenlightened estimation, excellent, if for no other reason than to encourage me to read a full version in the future. But I think most will agree his verse is readily comprehensible even while elegant, in classic Lewis style. I only wish he could have finished his translation. I appreciate the effo [...]

    6. "Absolutely brilliant" doesn't begin to cover it. I have been flattered in the past by learned Latinist professors and professionals who have praised my gift for making good English verse adaptations of Latin poetry. And I am just arrogant enough to think I have some skill in that regard. But it is truly humbling to see the work of a master. Even incomplete, Lewis' verse adaptation of the Aeneid is stunning. And reading some of his thoughts and notes gave me insights I've never had before - espe [...]

    7. 'C.S. Lewis’s Lost Aeneid shows just how great an influence Virgil’s epic poem was upon a later Christian apologist. An Oxford- and Harvard-trained classicist and now a teacher of classics at Groton, A.T. Reyes has done an admirable job editing Lewis’s previously unpublished translation of parts of the Aeneid. During his life, Lewis only completed translations of two of the epic’s 12 books. Books 1 and 2 appear here in full. But only fragments of Books 3 through 7 and Book 12 remain. No [...]

    8. The rhyming alexandrines and the diction give it a lively 1500s-1600s feel (err, no expert here so that's some quite possibly wrong approximation from my world lit 101 class) which is refreshing but I'm not really sold on it. The introduction informs me that Lewis believed people read the book for Dido and Aeneas and not Vergil, and I think the attitude is reflected in his translation. It is a good rendering of the story, but it doesn't feel like Vergil to me at all. But interesting reading and [...]

    9. Probably only for Lewis aficionados. A very good introduction summarizing Lewis's views on the poem, followed by a collection of every scrap of his translations. Apparently in his youth he translated all of Book One and a large chunk of Book Two. Beyond that are only fragments. I pretty much agree with his views on the Aeneid, but I found little to like in his translation into rhymed alexandrines. It sounded to me more like an Oxford don between the wars than like Virgil.

    10. A mixed edition. I found the many introductions relatively unhelpful - or, perhaps it would be more fair to say arrogant and pretentious. However, Lewis's translation is very enjoyable, but there's very little of it. In short, this is a volume I'd only recommend to someone with a keen interest in BOTH Lewis and the Aeneid.

    11. It's only Book I, significant portions of Books II and VI, and assorted snippets, but it's enough of a taste to wish that there were more of this elegant translation. Lewis's rhymed hexameters and faintly archaic diction preserve Virgil's gravitas but in timeless English verse that could be set alongside Spenser's or Milton's.

    12. Great translation. Wish it was complete. Hard to follow switching between translation and general story

    13. Lewis is a great translator and poet. It's cool to be able to see how he thinks, since I know the Latin.

    14. The little that C.s. Lewis did translate is my favorite take on Virgil's masterpiece I've ever read. It flows sweetly off the tongue while you read.

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