From Narnia to a Space Odyssey: The War of Ideas Between Arthur C. Clarke and C.S. Lewis

From Narnia to a Space Odyssey The War of Ideas Between Arthur C Clarke and C S Lewis From Narnia to Space Odyssey is the dialogue of letters between Arthur C Clarke and C S Lewis in which they debate discuss and ponder the potential and potential dangers of the rise of technology Th

  • Title: From Narnia to a Space Odyssey: The War of Ideas Between Arthur C. Clarke and C.S. Lewis
  • Author: Ryder W. Miller Arthur C. Clarke C.S. Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780743475181
  • Page: 119
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From Narnia to Space Odyssey is the dialogue of letters between Arthur C Clarke and C.S Lewis in which they debate, discuss, and ponder the potential and potential dangers of the rise of technology Their encounter sets the stage for much of what we face today is technology the beauty that will lead to a utopian society, or is it the beast that endangers our huFrom Narnia to Space Odyssey is the dialogue of letters between Arthur C Clarke and C.S Lewis in which they debate, discuss, and ponder the potential and potential dangers of the rise of technology Their encounter sets the stage for much of what we face today is technology the beauty that will lead to a utopian society, or is it the beast that endangers our humanity and spirit Clarke and Lewis began their correspondence in December 1943 when Clarke took Lewis to task for his remark about little rocket societies bent on exporting the crimes of mankind to other planets While they met only once at a well known pub in Oxford, with Lewis bringing along a good friend the Oxford don, one J.R.R Tolkien , their encounters lasted until 1954 when Clarke became involved in underwater exploration and left for the Great Barrier Reef Their concern about the future of society, even from differing perspectives, is both provocative and illuminating, and bears close reading today when we are all confronted with the question whether mankind can control the explosion of technology or will become its slave.

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      Published :2018-05-15T23:13:01+00:00

    One thought on “From Narnia to a Space Odyssey: The War of Ideas Between Arthur C. Clarke and C.S. Lewis”

    1. I really should give this book a lower rating. I can't in conscience recommend it to anyone. But I'm almost certainly going to buy a copy as soon as possible.The book concerns itself (at least nominally) with the differences in worldview betweenC. S. Lewis andArthur C. Clarke. Lewis saw the human race in general, and scientists in particular, as terribly flawed, and warlike; he saw the exploration of space as a way to repeat the mistakes of the past, and to expand imperialism throughout the univ [...]

    2. First of all, reader, understand that the title of this book is overstated. It is not a series of letters, a debate held in your hands. The first quarter of the book follows the exchange between Lewis and Clarke -- one pensive, one optimistic -- about mankind's seemingly imminent conquest of space, but this is then followed by essays and SF short stories by both Lewis and Clarke. Both men were interested in science fiction as a genre, having witnessed it erupt from obscurity within their own lif [...]

    3. got this from the brother in law. Skimming here and there between other books. I would guess it is best for the hard core sci fi and C.S. Lewis fans.

    4. I found this book in the library's donation bin, and I'm glad I did, despite it being little more than a collection of letters and mostly skippable commentary. There wasn't much of a thread connecting all of the different bits together, but that's alright. I needed the reminder that sometimes C.S. Lewis was a patent ass, and Arthur C. Clarke an incredibly good letter-writer. In fact, of the two, Clarke was the one to take the time and initiative to reach out time and again; Lewis responded, but [...]

    5. I really loved this book. There was not enough content with just the letters between the two, so they also included short biographies (of sorts) and science fiction short stories from both authors. I particularly enjoyed Clarke's stories because you can feel the excitement and optimism he has about the human race and space travel. He also has a way of tying scientific things that we already know into the stories. I do find (as does Lewis) that science fiction stories that could have just happene [...]

    6. The premise of this book is interesting but too thin to carry it: Arthur C. Clarke and C.S. Lewis once exchanged a series of letters where they discussed their contrasting views regarding space exploration. Clarke thought it would open a new frontier of possibility for humanity. Lewis thought it would open the door to humans spreading their corrupted and conquering ways throughout the universe. The letters are supplemented by two short essays about the authors and some stories and essays by each [...]

    7. I thought this book was interesting because it it showed some of the correspondence between C.S. Lewis and Arthur C. Clarke. It's always interesting to read letters between literary greats. Especially since they had very different beliefs and ideas regarding science fiction. And what was nice is that the book also had some really well written short stories by each writer. There was also a chapter in which Lewis gave his opinion on writing and critics which if you are an aspiring writer could be [...]

    8. I enjoyed reading the correspondence between Clarke and Lewis (though they were too few) and some Clarke short stories I hadn't read before. My main problems with the book were that it was the worst edited book I've ever read with typos everywhere and the writings of Lewis were nearly incomprehensible babbling. There was very little cohesion to the book: a few letters between the two, some short stories by Lewis, some by Clarke. The End. I felt no connecting thread between any of it.

    9. This book is a nice idea that simply doesn't have reality on its side. The letters herein show little engagement between the two beyond a cordial mutual respect. The editorial content by Miller is trite and amateurish (sorry dude, truth hurts). The copy editing is terrible as well.

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