A Rendezvous in Averoigne

A Rendezvous in Averoigne In H P Lovecraft wrote about Clark Ashton Smith In sheer daemonic strangeness and fertility of conception Mr Smith is perhaps unexcelled by any other writer dead or living Who else has seen suc

  • Title: A Rendezvous in Averoigne
  • Author: Clark Ashton Smith J.K. Potter Ray Bradbury
  • ISBN: 9780870541568
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1927, H.P Lovecraft wrote about Clark Ashton Smith In sheer daemonic strangeness and fertility of conception, Mr Smith is perhaps unexcelled by any other writer dead or living Who else has seen such gorgeous, luxuriant, and feverishly distorted visions of infinite spheres and multiple dimensions and lived to tell the tale If you relish horror or dark fantasy, andIn 1927, H.P Lovecraft wrote about Clark Ashton Smith In sheer daemonic strangeness and fertility of conception, Mr Smith is perhaps unexcelled by any other writer dead or living Who else has seen such gorgeous, luxuriant, and feverishly distorted visions of infinite spheres and multiple dimensions and lived to tell the tale If you relish horror or dark fantasy, and you have yet to discover Klarkash Ton, you have a real treat in store This beautifully produced Arkham House collection is a bejeweled corridor into the dark worlds of vampire cursed Averoigne, Zothique of the dying sun, primordial Hyperborea which, with its black, amorphous god Tsathoggua, is close in spirit to Lovecraft s Cthulhu Mythos , and others Smith is a consummate stylist whose evocations of lush exoticism and languid evil led critic Brian Stableford to call him the poet of American Decadence, and yet his tales are also humorous in a wry, macabre way A Rendezvous in Averoigne collects 30 tales, with illustrations by J.K Potter and an introduction by Ray Bradbury.Contents Introduction A Rendezvous in Averoigne essay by Ray BradburyA Rendezvous in Averoigne interior artwork by J.K PotterThe Holiness of Az darac 1933 The Colossus of Ylourgne 1934 The End of the Story 1930 A Rendezvous in Averoigne 1931 The Last Incantation 1930 The Death of Malygris 1934 A Voyage to Sfanomo 1931 The Weird of Avoosl Wuthoqquan 1932 The Seven Geases 1934 The Tale of Satampra Zeiros 1931 The Coming of the White Worm 1941 The City of the Singing Flame Singing Flame 1931 The Dweller in the Gulf 1960 The Chain of Aforgomon 1935 Genius Loci 1933 The Maze of Maal Dweb 1938 The Vaults of Yoh Vombis 1932 The Uncharted Isle 1930 The Planet of the Dead 1932 Master of the Asteroid 1932 The Empire of the Necromancers 1932 The Charnel God 1934 Xeethra 1934 The Dark Eidolon 1935 The Death of Ilalotha 1937 The Last Hieroglyph 1935 Necromancy in Naat 1936 The Garden of Adompha Zothique 1938 The Isle of the Torturers 1933 Morthylla 1953

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    One thought on “A Rendezvous in Averoigne”

    1. Smith is better than Lovecraft. There. I said it. Don't believe me? Get your hands on this and see for yourself. It's a bit of a splurge, but it's worth it - or you could just borrow mine, if we're friends.

    2. I have been a fan of the fantastic fiction of Clark Ashton Smith (1893-1961) ever since I read his short story "The Uncharted Isle" when I was in my early teens. Smith, or CAS, is primarily remembered today, if at all, for his association with his literary pen-pal H P Lovecraft and the so-called Cthulhu Mythos. CAS was a master storyteller and wrote excellent weird fantasy and horror. In some respects, I even prefer his work to that of Lovecraft. In addition being a well-regarded poet, CAS was a [...]

    3. This is a great collection of Clark Ashton Smith's short weird horror stories set in the eponymous region of France. The stories weave together a cohesive region of rural France forgotten by the 'modern' world of the 1930's Indeed, many of the stories contained within are set in the Middle Ages and make excellent fairy tales.In all a great read for just about anyone fond of myth, magic and weird horror.

    4. Possibly the best collection of work from an author that I've ever had the pleasure of reading. Poetic and morbid at turns; beautiful and remote at others. Clark Ashton Smith was and is one of the most unique and talented voices to write in Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, or the Weird.

    5. I have a particular fondness for this book, because I'm the model for several of the illustrations.

    6. It is amazing to me that more people aren't aware of/in love with Clark Ashton Smith's short stories. I'm amazed so few were adapted to other media (thank you, Richard Corben!) because I kept thinking about what great horror movies a lot of them would make. His command of the English language is impressive. I could expand my vocabulary two-fold by studying his writing. And his ideas are twisted and original. Not every one lands well, but even the ones that aren't great still have a very real WTF [...]

    7. If you're going to have any CAS book, it should probably be this one. The Averoigne stories are great fun.

    8. A wonderful collecton of CAS tales; eerily illustrated with black and white photos by J. K. Potter; for these alone the books is worth the price.

    9. The entire reason I bought this collection was for one story. I'd read this book before, it was borrowed from a friend, and there was one story that stuck with me. Just one. And then I was fifteen, so I skimmed the rest. So now, as a twenty-year-old, I figured that, not only would I enjoy the other stories more, but I could re-enjoy this weird story that I remembered as being totally horrifying, but I must've just made it up or something, because it wasn't in there. So that was disappointing and [...]

    10. Pocos comentarios más elogiosos puedo lanzarle a la obra de Ashton Smith que poner ante cualquier pequeño defecto que pueda tener su prosa o narración la apabullante capacidad de arrastrarte en la dirección que pretende como único guía de sus mundos mágicos o alienígenas. Poco importa que las premisas de algunos de sus relatos resulten un tanto ridículas al principio o que en ocasiones se deje llevar por un torrente de adjetivos hacia sus vástagos, todo eso queda olvidado cuando su pas [...]

    11. You know, when you read works of the weird and supernatural from this area, you feel you've been cursed - born into an era where the English language has been stripped of its poesy and colourful motion. Would you describe a man's expression as his "vizard" today? Or shorten "bewilderment" to "wilderment"? Where you and I eat food, one once consumed "viands"This antiquity of writing makes this ghoulish tale, a standard vampire story by any other definition, such a bedazzlement to read. How much m [...]

    12. It took me forever to read Clark Ashton Smith’s work, mostly because so much of it is out of print. But I’m glad I finally got to. It’s a perfect blend of horror, fantasy, and sci-fi, often within the same story. The language is grandiloquent and lyric, with a haunting quality.

    13. A man walks into some scary, evil woods. He says, "wow! These are some scary, evil woods." He meets a scary, evil wizard. He says, "wow! This is one scary, evil wizard." The wizard messes him up with some scary, evil magic. The man dies. The end.

    14. Smith wrote absurdly beautiful prose with articulate sentence structures and a rich vocabulary. This is what happens when a poet of the highest degree writes strange stories for fun and profit. His weird fiction is just plain cool and worth emulation.

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